Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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p. vii

Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

Burt Monroe, Jr., was the single most important authority on bird distribution in Honduras. His work is the bible of all serious ornithogeographical study of the country. I have also been greatly influenced by the writing of Jes

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Introduction to Conservation Geography

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pp. 3-11

In eastern Honduras, the Three-wattled Bellbird is a wanderer of many names and inspirations. In one village it is p

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Ornithophilia

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pp. 12-19

A Clay-colored Robin’s dawn song flutes from its nocturnal roost in the backyard avocado tree while the first Black Vultures skim the rooftops of Juticalpa. Lucita, her mother Clara, and grandmother Eva are washing down crumbly rolls with coffee to fortify them for the excursion. Before sunup, doña Clara sends her mother and little daughter on their way to...

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Historical and Geographical Background

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pp. 20-35

Birds and people share a long history in what is today Honduras. For close to ten thousand years, humans have dwelt in or near pine woods, rain forests, prairies, savannas, and thorn forests and have witnessed these landscapes yield to each other in complex sequences caused by continental placation, climate change, geologic events, and human agency....

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Women, Children, and Birds

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pp. 36-49

Olancho is dominated and controlled by a minority, grown men. Women, especially in the countryside, remain largely within the domestic sphere, and their relationships with birds are quite different than those of men. Women, much more than men, raise their children, especially their girls. Something wonderful happens between children and...

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Counterpoint of Zorzal and Zopilote in Juticalpa [Includes Image Plates]

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pp. 50-68

Latin American urban areas may not seem likely candidates for havens of biodiversity. Given their pressing social problems, it may appear pointless to write of the relationships they foster between birds and people. However, for many city dwellers, wild things hold great significance: birds are not taken for granted as they might be in the countryside. Birds...

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Large Private Landowners as Conservationists

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pp. 69-87

Large landowners, known as terratenientes, hold most of the fertile land on the plains of Olancho and own vast properties in the mountains as well. By virtue of the amount of land they control, their management decisions are important to birds and other wild fauna. Some are grass-only cattle ranchers, investing large sums in chemicals to ensure that...

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Pajarales in Human Landscapes

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pp. 88-106

Latin America is home to more bird species than any area of similar size on the planet. Countries such as Honduras have almost as many species as all of North America north of Mexico. Central Olancho—one mountain range and surrounding plains—has more than five hundred species of birds (the entire province contains around six hundred). In Olancho,...

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Owls, Cacaos, and Golden-cheeked Warblers

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pp. 107-123

The cacao or Red-throated Caracara, though believed by ornithologists to have been extirpated from Honduras, hangs on in the remote hill country of northern Olancho. It is an everyday bird to those living on the margins; in comparatively modernized areas like La Venta, the cacao is now a memory....

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People and Avifauna of Montane Rain Forests

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pp. 124-145

Olanchanos refer to both the rain forest and cloud forest landscapes as monta

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Landscape Dialogues

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pp. 146-160

The landscape speaks to all who listen. Bellbirds still call from the trees around El Murmullo, a village nestled in the Sierra de Agalta above Catacamas. Murmullo, “Murmuring,” is the sound that the nearby river makes as its white waters tumble over limestone boulders. Just up the road is Las Delicias, “The Delights.” Both communities were founded...

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Appendix: Birds Recorded in Central Olancho, 1937–2002

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pp. 161-176

This list contains the 476 bird species recorded to date from the area covered in this book. The area is shown in figure 2 and amounts to approximately three thousand square kilometers (excluding the southern Valle de Azacualpa sector). Please note that as little as 5 percent of the total area has actually been surveyed in detail; however, all the major habitats have been visited. The bird list is distilled...

Notes

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pp. 177-188

Glossary of Spanish Terms

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pp. 189-199

Bibliography

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pp. 201-206

Index

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pp. 207-231