In this Book

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An interdisciplinary effort of scholars from history, women’s studies, and family and consumer sciences, Remaking Home Economics covers the field’s history of opening career opportunities for women and responding to domestic and social issues. Calls to “bring back home economics” miss the point that it never went away, say Sharon Y. Nickols and Gwen Kay—home economics has been remaking itself, in study and practice, for more than a century. These new essays, relevant for a variety of fields—history, women’s studies, STEM, and family and consumer sciences itself—take both current and historical perspectives on defining issues including home economics philosophy, social responsibility, and public outreach; food and clothing; gender and race in career settings; and challenges to the field’s identity and continuity.

Home economics history offers a rich case study for exploring common ground between the broader culture and this highly gendered profession. This volume describes the resourcefulness of past scholars and professionals who negotiated with cultural and institutional constraints to produce their work, as well as the innovations of contemporary practitioners who continue to change the profession, including its name and identity.

The widespread urge to reclaim domestic skills, along with a continual need for fresh ways to address obesity, elder abuse, household debt, and other national problems affirms the field’s vitality and relevance. This volume will foster dialogue both inside and outside the academy about the changes that have remade (and are remaking) family and consumer sciences.

Contributors: Elizabeth L. Andress, Rima D. Apple, Jorge H. Atiles, Susan F. Clark, Billie J. Collier, Caroline E. Crocoll, Stephanie M. Foss, Gwen Kay, Emma M. Laing, Richard D. Lewis, Peggy S. Meszaros, Rachel Louise Moran, Virginia Moxley, Sharon Y. Nickols, Margarete Ordon, Linda Przybyszewski, Penny A. Ralston, Jane Schuchardt.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title page, Copyright page
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. p. vii
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  1. Introduction
  2. Sharon Y. Nickols, Gwen Kay
  3. pp. 1-8
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  1. I. Home Economics Philosophy, Social Responsibility, and Outreach
  2. pp. 9-10
  1. 1. Knowledge, Mission, Practice: The Enduring Legacy of Home Economics
  2. Sharon Y. Nickols, Billie J. Collier
  3. pp. 11-35
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  1. 2. Extending Knowledge, Changing Lives: Cooperative Extension Family and Consumer Sciences
  2. Jorge H. Atiles, Caroline E. Crocoll, Jane Schuchardt
  3. pp. 36-53
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  1. 3. Home Economics in the Twentieth Century: A Case of Lost Identity?
  2. Rima D. Apple
  3. pp. 54-70
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  1. II. Achieving Well-Being Through Food and Clothing
  2. pp. 71-72
  1. 4. Our Own Food: From Canning Clubs to Community Gardens
  2. Elizabeth L. Andress, Susan F. Clark
  3. pp. 73-94
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  1. 5. Weighing in About Weight: Advisory Power in the Bureau of Home Economics
  2. Rachel Louise Moran
  3. pp. 95-108
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  1. 6. From the War on Hunger to the Fight Against Obesity
  2. Richard D. Lewis, Emma M. Laing, Stephanie M. Foss
  3. pp. 109-127
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  1. 7. How Home Economists Taught American Women to Dress, 1910–1950
  2. Linda Przybyszewski
  3. pp. 128-144
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  1. 8. New Patterns for Women’s Clothing: Consumption versus Sustainability
  2. Margarete Ordon
  3. pp. 145-158
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  1. III. Race and Gender in Home Economics Careers
  2. pp. 159-160
  1. 9. “It Was a Special Time”: African American Deans of Home Economics in Predominantly White, Comprehensive Universities, 1987–2004
  2. Penny A. Ralston
  3. pp. 161-178
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  1. 10. “Cookin’ with Gas”: Home Economists in the Atlanta Natural Gas Industry, 1950–1995
  2. Sharon Y. Nickols
  3. pp. 179-195
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  1. 11. Science Matters: Home Economics and STEM Fields of Study
  2. Peggy S. Meszaros
  3. pp. 196-212
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  1. IV. Home Economics Identity and Continuity
  2. pp. 213-214
  1. 12. Changing Names, Keeping Identity
  2. Gwen Kay
  3. pp. 215-228
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  1. 13. Building a Legacy in Stone: Rocks in the Road
  2. Virginia Moxley
  3. pp. 229-246
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  1. 14. Looking Around, Thinking Ahead
  2. Sharon Y. Nickols, Gwen Kay, Billie J. Collier
  3. pp. 247-260
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  1. Suggested Readings and Resources
  2. pp. 261-264
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 265-268
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 269-273
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Additional Information

ISBN
9780820348087
Related ISBN
9780820348063
MARC Record
OCLC
910070611
Pages
272
Launched on MUSE
2015-05-23
Language
English
Open Access
No
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