Cover

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Title page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xiv

This project would not have been possible without the guidance and support of colleagues and mentors. The project that ultimately grew into this book was launched by a conversation with Ohio University professor Joseph Bernt, who was then graduate director of the university’s E. W. Scripps School of Journalism...

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Introduction: Midcentury Media’s Trip with LSD

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pp. 1-16

This study examines media coverage of the powerful hallucinogenic drug lysergic acid diethylamide, also known as acid or LSD, during the roughly decade-and-a-half period between the first news reports on the drug in the mid-1950s and its tumble from the news agenda after 1968, by which time it had become...

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1. Early Restrictions on Drug Speech, 1900–1956

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pp. 17-41

In 1968, when the public interest in and media attention to psychedelic drugs seemed to be reaching a crescendo, the LSD researcher and addiction expert Sidney Cohen reflected that the lavish descriptions of psychedelic drug trips and breathless testimonials proliferating in contemporary media were...

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2. Introducing LSD, 1953–1956

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pp. 42-67

After decades of willful disregard, the news media turned its attention to the otherworldly, internal effects of drugs as a result of external developments that cast these experiences in an unexpected new light. First was the extravagant scientific interest in LSD, a new drug that seemed to illuminate the divide...

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3. Creating a Psychedelic Past, 1954–1960

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pp. 68-88

The new salience of psychedelic drug use in the mid-1950s triggered a flurry of magazine articles and broadcast accounts describing the apparently similar uses of drugs in Indian rituals and the effects of the drugs on intrepid journalists. Invariably referring to Huxley’s Doors of Perception, these accounts capitalized on the...

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4. Research at the Intersection of Media and Medicine, 1957–1962

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pp. 89-114

In 1953, while Sandoz was introducing the experimental drug LSD to researchers and psychiatrists, James Coleman, Elihu Katz, and Herbert Menzel launched the study of the diffusion of tetracycline that resulted in the landmark Medical Innovation, cementing the idea that innovations spread through interpersonal...

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5. Luce, Leary, and LSD, 1963–1965

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pp. 115-144

The hardening scientific consensus against LSD might have seemed to signal an end to glorious descriptions of LSD trips in news media. That fact that it did not—and indeed, media descriptions of lavish drug trips multiplied, particularly in magazines—was the result of a number of factors internal and external...

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6. Moral Panic and Media Hype, 1966–1968

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pp. 145-180

Drugs seemed to be on everyone’s mind in the late 1960s. Marijuana, not LSD, was the drug of choice in college dorms and hippie pads across the country. A new familiarity with marijuana budding from its new popularity with upper- and middle-class youth undermined the legacy of antimarijuana campaigns of...

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Postscript: Psychedelic Media

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pp. 181-190

In 1968, Richard M. Nixon successfully campaigned for the U.S. presidency on a promise to restore law and order to a nation jolted by riots, political protests, and the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy. Nixon positioned himself as the voice of Americans who were frustrated by the...

Notes

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pp. 191-226

Index

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pp. 227-250