In this Book

summary
This book revisits the perennial challenge that scholars, economists, and politicians have been grappling with since the 1960s. Development, in this book, has been defined in a context that projects it as a multidimensional and complex process which seeks to enhance the human, social, economic and cultural welfare of the people. This book calls for a rethinking of trade and industry for Africa�s development. It uses data drawn from national development plans and strategies, and trade and industry issues have been prioritized at the continental level, in key policy documents. On the whole Africa�s industry and trade performance have been poor in spite of national, regional, and continental plans. The contributors to this volume propose some alternative strategies and policies which are necessary for trade and industry to grow and to contribute to the wellbeing of Africa�s people. It calls for a developmental trade and industry policy which, fundamentally, must be people-centred. African states should invest time, energy and resources to develop policies which will take into consideration African realities.The different contributors are aware that Africa has experienced strong economic growth in the recent past but this growth has largely been due to a strong demand for Africa�s primary commodity exports. It has also been a result of increases in productivity and domestic investment and remittances from Africans living in the Diaspora. It is important to note that despite this unprecedented growth performance, the impact of trade and industry on development has been limited. The book arguesthat a structural transformation of Africa�s economies is inevitable if Africa is to achieve the shift from the dominant paradigm of production and export of primary goods. The various contributors to this book agree that there is need to rethink policy and strategy in order to achieve industrial development in Africa. There is no unique solution or answer that can fit all situations as African countries are not the same. While Africa can draw lessons from other regions which have successfully industrialized, this book argues that policies and strategies will have to be adapted to country-specific situations and circumstances.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Abbreviations
  2. pp. vii-x
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  1. Tables
  2. pp. xi-xiv
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  1. Boxes
  2. pp. xv-xvi
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  1. Figures
  2. p. xvii
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  1. Acknowledgement
  2. p. xviii
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. xix-xx
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  1. Foreword
  2. Aderibigbe S. Olomola
  3. pp. xxi-xxx
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  1. Introduction
  2. Theresa Moyo
  3. pp. xxxi-liv
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  1. Part One. Trade and Industrial Policy in Africa: Theoretical Debates and Experiences from Developing Regions
  2. pp. 1-2
  1. 1. The Case for a Developmental Trade and Industrial Policy for Africa
  2. Theresa Moyo
  3. pp. 3-30
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  1. 2. The Theoretical Basis, Elements and Impact of Nigeria’s Trade and Industrial Policy under the Structural Adjustment Programme
  2. Anthony I. Monye-Emina
  3. pp. 31-46
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  1. 3. Trade, Industrial Policy and Development in the Era of Globalization in Africa: The Case of Botswana and Tanzania
  2. Stephen M. Kapunda
  3. pp. 47-66
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  1. 4. Economic Reforms in Zambia and India: Comparative Trade and Industrial Policy during 1991-1992
  2. Euston Chiputa
  3. pp. 67-98
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  1. 5. The Emergence of China in Cameroon: Trade Impact and Evolution of Trade Configuration
  2. Sunday A. Khan
  3. pp. 99-120
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  1. Part Two. Trade and Industrial Policy: Regional and International Context
  2. pp. 121-122
  1. 6. EU-Africa Economic Partnership Agreements: Risks, Rewards and Requisites for Agricultural Trade and African Development
  2. Aderibigbe S. Olomola
  3. pp. 123-158
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  1. 7. Trade Facilitation: Implications for Intra-African Trade in a Globalized Economy
  2. Ntangsi Max Memfih
  3. pp. 159-180
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  1. 8. Facilitating the Production and Export of Manufactured Goods in Africa and Asia/Pacific: A Comparative Analysis Using Panel Data
  2. Oluyele Akinkugbe
  3. pp. 181-198
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  1. 9. Africa’s Development, Climate Change and Carbon Trade: Whose Agenda is it, Anyway?
  2. Godwell Nhamo
  3. pp. 199-222
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  1. Part Three. Intellectual Property Rights, Technology Transfer and Culture Policy
  2. pp. 223-224
  1. 10. Intellectual Property and Technology Transfer Towards African Countries: Is International Law a Beneficial Policy?
  2. Patrick Juvet Lowe
  3. pp. 225-244
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  1. 11. The UNESCO Convention for the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions: Implications for African Trade and Culture Policy
  2. E. S. Nwauche
  3. pp. 245-274
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  1. Part Four. Institutional Dimensions of Trade and Industrial Policy
  2. pp. 275-276
  1. 12. Rethinking Industrial Policy in Africa: Toward an Institutional Framework
  2. Howard Stein
  3. pp. 277-296
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  1. 13. Institutional Foundation of Trade and Industrial Policies in Africa
  2. Adewole Musiliu Adeolu
  3. pp. 297-334
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  1. 14. Conclusion and Recommendations
  2. Theresa Moyo, Aderibigbe S. Olomola
  3. pp. 335-350
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  1. Back Cover
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Additional Information

ISBN
9782869786196
Related ISBN
9782869785717
MARC Record
OCLC
906006347
Pages
404
Launched on MUSE
2015-04-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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