Cover

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Title Page, Frontispiece, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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Preface

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pp. ix-xii

To be invited by my colleagues on the Board of Trustees to write the modern history of The College of Wooster is an honor. The author of two earlier volumes, Lucy Lillian Notestein, was a distinguished graduate of the College, whose father was a member of its first graduating class in 1873 and of its faculty for fifty-five years. Perhaps no better distinction...

Part 1: The Lowry Years

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1. A Visionary Arrives

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pp. 3-16

This story begins with Howard Lowry—how could it not begin with Howard Lowry, who brought to The College of Wooster the academic standard that for nearly three-quarters of a century has distinguished it from other outstanding liberal arts colleges; the scholar admired and honored on both sides of the Atlantic; the orator with a baritone so mellifluous that...

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2. The Vets Arrive—and I.S., Too!

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pp. 17-28

About once a century, the U.S. Congress passes a law of monumental importance to education. In the eighteenth century, under the Articles of Confederation it approved the Land Ordinance of 1785, which, among other things, led to the creation of the states of Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, and Wisconsin and barred slavery in those mostly unsettled western...

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3. Not as Quiet as It Seemed

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pp. 29-42

As the College along with most of the nation settled comfortably into the 1950s, the veterans were graduated mostly, and Independent Study was ensconced, and America liked Ike. Gone was not only the fighting of World War II but also the rationing and other home-front sacrifices. The economy was booming as Detroit manufactured cars instead of tanks and planes, and new...

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4. Celebration and Dismay

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pp. 43-54

As the decade of the ’60s began, with bubbles of unrest ruffling the mostly placid waters of the earlier decade, the College’s leaders looked positively toward the Centennial coming in 1966, and, needless to say, a fund-raising drive keyed to the big event. The goal was set at $20 million, a relatively modest amount, one that the trustees and President Lowry felt...

Part 2: Changing with the Times

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5. Scientia et Religio ex Uno Fonte

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pp. 57-70

In the Voice of December 9, 1960, appeared a statement that can be observed as a turning point in the history of religion at the College. It covered some seventeen hundred words, signed by nearly all of the fortyfour Presbyterian Scholars. To be a Presbyterian Scholar—and more of them chose Wooster than any other Presbyterian-related college—was a...

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6. “Quite Astounding Women”

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pp. 71-79

Yvonne Williams, professor emeritus of political science and black studies and former dean of the faculty, recalled a vivid introduction to the College in 1959:

I was very much in awe of many of the women who were on the faculty. They were quite astounding women when you think about it. People like Dorothy Mateer, Fran Guile, Ibby Coyle, Maria...

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7. The Journey to Diversity

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pp. 80-94

On the occasion of the fortieth reunion of the class of 1963, June 7, 2003, alumni and friends from many classes gathered in the Gault Recital Hall of the Scheide Music Center for a panel discussion. The panel brought together three men of the class who entered the College in the autumn of 1959, had been outstanding undergraduates, and had built outstanding...

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8. New and Renew

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pp. 95-106

No college could remain the same structurally over decades, but it is noteworthy that every single academic building on Wooster’s campus has been either constructed or largely remodeled since 1960—some of them put to entirely new, almost ironic uses. A few buildings of older vintage have disappeared, notably Hoover Cottage, built in 1884. Some older structures...

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9. Homes Away from Home

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pp. 107-117

For Wooster women who remember living in Hoover Cottage as freshmen, in Holden Hall or its Annex as sophomores and juniors, and in Babcock Hall as seniors, or men who lived in Douglass Hall as freshmen and in Kenarden Lodge (or Livingston Lodge) the next three years, twenty-first-century accommodations are dizzying. For one important...

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10. Ex Libris

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pp. 118-124

Every campus has its distinctive building. It’s the Texas Tower at the university in Austin or the Gothic Chapel at Duke in Durham, North Carolina. At the University of Alabama it’s the football stadium. At Wooster it’s Kauke Hall. But the true heart of any institution of higher education is its library. Major research universities have several libraries, but very...

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11. The Scots Tale

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pp. 125-138

On a Sunday evening, Aug. 22, 1945, L. C. “Coach” Boles suffered a fatal stroke at his home, at the age of sixty-two. It was nothing less than a historic moment for Wooster athletics. Boles had come to Wooster in 1915 and for more than a decade coached the football, basketball, and baseball teams himself; four of his football teams were unbeaten. But the...

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12. A Chapel for Its Time

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pp. 139-150

It rises from a little dale, startlingly light, its flat roof sprouting oddly angled corner panels that might be called turrets, were they not so sleekly modern. It stands central to the campus, just off Quinby Quadrangle, tucked between stately Kauke Hall and Taylor Hall. It is a religious sanctuary, yet so much more, symbolizing a momentous change in College...

Part 3: Renewal, Growth, Ambition

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13. The Worst of Times . . . and Revival

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pp. 153-165

It is probable that the years 1967–70 constituted the worst times for The College of Wooster since Old Main burned down in December 1901, leading Louis Holden to cry out memorably to Andrew Carnegie, “Yesterday I was president of a college. Today I am president of a hole in the ground.” Unlike in 1901, however, when Wooster’s very existence appeared...

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14. The World Intrudes

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pp. 166-173

From a parochial perspective, the College’s first years under Garber Drushal were traumatic enough, as it struggled to recover from the shock of Lowry’s death and to right its financial ship. But this campus, half a square mile in a small town in the Midwest, did not exist in a hermetically sealed dome. As much as at any time in its recent history, with the exception...

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15. The Word Is Quality

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pp. 174-191

In all the history of The College of Wooster, only two presidents served longer than Henry Copeland—Charles Wishart, twenty-five years from 1919 to 1944, and Howard Lowry, twenty-three years from 1944 to 1967. Copeland was forty-one years old and had been at the College eleven years when, in 1977, he accepted a job that he had not foreseen. He left it...

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16. Searching for a President

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pp. 192-199

Henry Copeland had led a renaissance of the College, but after fifteen years, he was ready to let go. He told Stan Gault, the board chairman, three years in advance. Since Copeland would be a relatively young fifty-nine in 1995, when he planned to retire from the post, his resignation would come as a surprise, so Gault insisted that the president make his decision...

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17. The Legacy of a Hometown Boy

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pp. 200-207

In examining the trajectory of The College of Wooster since the middle of the twentieth century, a handful of names stand out, starting, of course, with Howard Lowry. But if Lowry provided the intellectual force that began Wooster’s ascendance to the highest echelons of liberal arts colleges, Stan Gault’s impact on the institution is virtually immeasurable—both...

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18. In the Long Run, We’ll Be Fine

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pp. 208-217

Stan Hales inherited a tough task. He was following the presidency of Henry Copeland—which had been a success in every measurable way—but not following it directly; rather, it had been an academic year of curiosity about who Copeland’s successor might be, then a spring fraught with anger and anxiety about the failed transition. During what could...

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19. Alpha and Omega

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pp. 218-225

The capstone of the academic program at The College of Wooster, as everyone who knows anything about the College knows, is Independent Study. For more than six decades, it has offered students an intellectual challenge, but more, it has demanded discipline and resilience. If I.S. is the Omega of Wooster student scholarship, the Alpha is a program for...

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20. Teaching and Research, Well Remembered

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pp. 226-238

Since the moment Howard Lowry recommended, and the faculty approved, Independent Study in the 1940s, a fundamental principle—it can be called a grand bargain—has shaped the role of the faculty: its members must combine attention to and skills in teaching and mentoring students, and they must pursue with energy and ambition scholarly research. This...

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21. The Future Is Now

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pp. 239-252

There is a tale that in 1972 Richard Nixon, upon meeting Zhou Enlai, the scholarly Chinese premier, attempted a friendly conversation opening by asking Zhou what he thought of the French Revolution. Zhou, who had studied in France in the 1920s, is said to have responded, “Too early to say.” Whether true or not, the story illustrates the long-range perspective...

Notes

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pp. 253-269

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Sources Cited

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pp. 270-275

The research for this book took many forms. Interviews and conversations, which gave the subjects the opportunity to reminisce as well as to provide important information, were particularly enjoyable for me, and I hope for them. These were lively interviews, nearly a hundred, with women and men who have been faculty, administrators, trustees, and other alumni of the College (in a few cases...

Index

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pp. 276-290

Image Plates

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Back Cover

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