Cover

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Series page, Title page, Copyright

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Contents

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List of Figures

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p. vii

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Acknowledgments

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p. ix

This volume emerged from a series of conversations, impressions, and insights that I have had over a number of years with friends, colleagues, and students as we considered the practice and the study of Islam in the Caribbean. This journey of ideas began a couple of decades ago during my dissertation fieldwork...

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1. Introduction: A Storied Hemisphere

Aisha Khan

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pp. 1-22

More than a quarter of a century ago Talal Asad called for scholars to dispense with the convention of approaching Islam in terms of “a fixed cast of Islamic dramatis personae, enacting a predetermined story,” and instead to understand that the coherence of “the world of Islam is essentially ideological...

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2. Contours: Approaching Islam, Comparatively Speaking

Aisha Khan

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pp. 23-46

When he gave his tours of Park51, or the “Ground Zero mosque,” to tourist groups in New York City, most of whom were not Muslim, American Muslim activist and former Park51 employee Rashid Dar said he liked to emphasize a message of “unlearning Islam and Muslims as strange or foreign people...

Part I. Histories: Presence, Absence, Remaking

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3. “Oriental Hieroglyphics Understood Only by the Priesthood and a Chosen Few”: The Islamic Orientalism of White and Black Masons and Shriners

Jacob S. Dorman

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pp. 49-68

Black nationalist and freemason Martin R. Delany reported to a meeting of African American freemasons in 1853 that before the construction of King Solomon’s Temple, Masonry was originally taught through “Egyptian, Ethiopian, Assyrian, and other oriental hieroglyphics understood only by the priesthood...

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4. Locating Mecca: Religious and Political Discord in the Javanese Community in Pre-Independence Suriname

Rosemarijn Hoefte

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pp. 69-91

Rukun or harmony is one of the central values in Javanese life (De Waal-Malefijt 1963: 57–58).1 This principle remained in force in the Javanese migrant communities in Suriname in the twentieth century.2 Solidarity, cooperation, and peace were important notions when adjusting to a new life in a not very...

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5. Fear of a Brown Planet: Pan-Islamism, Black Nationalism, and the Tribal Twenties

Nathaniel Deutsch

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pp. 92-114

On March 1, 1961, Malcolm X, then the national spokesman for the Nation of Islam, delivered a broadcast from the organization’s Mosque #7 in New York City in which he condemned Christianity for creating a slave mentality among African Americans. Rather than citing the teachings of Elijah Muhammad...

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6. Insha'Allah/Ojalá, Yes Yes Y’all: Puerto Ricans (Re)examining and (Re)imagining Their Identities through Islam and Hip Hop

Omar Ramadan-Santiago

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pp. 115-138

I had just arrived in Puerto Rico to start my summer research for my master’s thesis in June 2010 when I found out that somewhere on the island in a few hours there was going to be an educational panel on Puerto Rican Muslims. I quickly informed my aunt and we made a few calls to figure out where it...

Part II. Circulation of Identities, Politics of Belonging

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7. Between Terror and Transcendence: Global Narratives of Islam and the Political Scripts of Guadeloupe’s Indianité

Yarimar Bonilla

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pp. 141-162

The events of September 11, 2001, marked the onset of a new “war on terror” that has been fought on the terrain of the imagination as much as on the battlefield. One of the consequences of this post-9/11 era has been the emergence of a new iconography of terror that shapes contemporary constructions...

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8. The Politics of Conversion to Islam in Southern Mexico

Sandra Cañas Cuevas

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pp. 163-185

The conversion to Islam among Mayas in southern Mexico is best understood against the backdrop of larger processes taking place in Latin America and more specifically in Mexico—namely, the crisis facing the Catholic Church and the increasing religious diversification of the population.1 In 1950 Catholics...

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9. Bahamian and Brazilian Muslimahs: Struggle for Identity and Belonging

Jerusa Ali

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pp. 186-214

The Bahamas and Brazil share very little in terms of demography, language, or cultural heritage, yet like other countries in the Americas, both have growing Muslim communities who must confront many of the same obstacles to practicing their faith and maintaining their unique cultural and Islamic...

Part III. Spatial Practices and the Trinidadian Landscape

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10. “Up Against a Wall”: Muslim Women’s Struggle to Reclaim Masjid Space in Trinidad and Tobago

Rhoda Reddock

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pp. 217-248

When in the first decade of this century the women of the San Juan Muslim Ladies Organization began their resistance against efforts to curtail and circumscribe their attendance at and use of masjid space at the Nur E Islam masjid in El Socorro, San Juan, Trinidad and Tobago, they were possibly unaware...

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11. Democracy, Gender, and Indian Muslim Modernity in Trinidad

Gabrielle Jamela Hosein

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pp. 249-268

In this essay I explore how Indian Muslim modernity is both accomplished through and ruptured by gendered democratic processes and community and citizen belonging. This dynamic appears in deliberations regarding the spiritually “correct” practice of racial, class, and religious distinctions as well...

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12. More Than Dawud and Jalut: Decriminalizing the Jamaat al Muslimeen and Madressa in Trinidad

Jeanne P. Baptiste

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pp. 269-294

Peter E. Hopkins, Mei-Po Kwan, and Cara Carmichael Aitchison contend that “just as global migration and mobility are important to the geographies of Muslim identities, so too are local and regional experiences.1 Local experiences of negotiating Muslim identities, creating Muslim space, and managing...

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13. Island Currents, Global Aesthetics: Islamic Iconography in Trinidad

Patricia Mohammed

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pp. 295-326

The history of Islam in the Caribbean has not been rigorously traced (Khan 2004: 190).1 No pure story of traditions that arrive and are transformed over time by individuals or groups emerges. As with all cultural phenomena, growth and expansion are influenced by factors of migration, global currents...

List of Contributors

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pp. 327-330

Index

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pp. 331-350