Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

Most chapters in Boys Love Manga and Beyond were first presented at the workshop “Glocal Polemics of Boys Love: Production, Circulation and Censorship,” organized by Kazumi Nagaike and Katsuhiko Suganuma at Oita University in January 2011. The workshop was cosponsored by Oita University’s Center for International Education and Research and the University...

read more

A Note on Japanese Names and Terminology

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-2

Throughout the text we have reproduced Japanese names in the natural Japanese order, that is, surname first, except in reference to scholars who normally publish in English. Note that among the contributors to and editors of this volume, only Fujimoto Yukari and Ishida Hitoshi publish predominantly in Japanese, and thus their names are written in Japanese...

read more

An Introduction to “Boys Love” in Japan

Mark McLelland, James Welker

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-20

If you walk into a typical bookstore in Japan today, somewhere on the shelves you are likely to find various books depicting romantic and sexual relations between beautiful, stylish male characters. These male homoerotic stories might be found in the form of manga—the name for Japan’s globally known narrative comics—or in the form of “light...

read more

A Genealogy of Boys Love: The Gaze of the Girl and the Bishōnen Body in the Prewar Images of Takabatake Kashō

Barbara Hartley

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 21-41

As Teresa de Lauretis observes, “the cultural conceptions of male and female as two complementary yet mutually exclusive categories” is a common denominator that applies across cultures.1 These categories are the basis of “a gender system . . . that correlates sex to cultural contexts according to social values.”2 While often construed as a categorical imperative, “gender” is, to...

read more

A Brief History of Shōnen’ai, Yaoi, and Boys Love

James Welker

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 42-75

Originating in Japan, manga, anime, “light novels,” video games, live-action films, and related media and goods depicting beautiful adolescent boys or young men in same-sex romantic or sexual relationships have become an increasingly global phenomenon over the past two decades or so. Created for and, largely, by adolescent girls and women, this visual and narrative...

read more

The Evolution of BL as “Playing with Gender”: Viewing the Genesis and Development of BL from a Contemporary Perspective

Fujimoto Yukari, Joanne Quimby

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 76-92

It was about twenty years ago that I wrote the critical essay “Transgender: Female Hermaphrodites and Male Androgynes,” in which I traced the genealogy of gender-bending in shōjo manga.1 The article takes up the subversive use of “girls dressed as boys,” “boys dressed as girls,” “shōnen’ai” (boys love), “lesbians,” and “polymorphous perversity” in...

read more

What Can We Learn from Japanese Professional BL Writers?: A Sociological Analysis of Yaoi/BL Terminology and Classifications

Kazuko Suzuki

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 93-118

In English, “boys love” (abbreviated as “BL”) is often explained as a Japanese term for female-oriented fictional media created by female authors that depict male homoerotic desire and romance.1 Although the genre is called boys love, it deals with relationships involving men who are pubescent or older.2 In Japan, there is currently also a clear distinction made between female-oriented...

read more

What Is Japanese “BL Studies?”: A Historical and Analytical Overview

Kazumi Nagaike, Tomoko Aoyama

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 119-140

The term “BL” (boys love) has been widely used since the mid-1990s to indicate prose and graphic novels and associated genres such as games, animated works, and films that deal with male–male romance, often including sexually explicit material and usually produced by women for female audiences. The theme of male homosexuality in women’s literary texts, however, has a much...

read more

Politics of Utopia: Fantasy, Pornography, and Boys Love

Rio Otomo

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 141-152

Photographic artworks by Robert Mapplethorpe (1946–1989) caused controversy in the United States in the late 1980s. Religious-right activists, calling for censorship, claimed that the explicit homosexuality and nudity presented in the photographs were offensive. They also argued that public funding for the exhibition of such works should be withdrawn. These activists...

read more

Moe Talk: Affective Communication among Female Fans of Yaoi in Japan

Patrick W. Galbraith

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 153-168

In the growing body of literature on boys love (BL) manga in Japan, more attention is paid to texts than readers. Where discussions of BL readers do appear, they tend to be autobiographical or abstract.2 This has led to much speculation about the identifications and orientations of BL readers—they are straight women, lesbians, men in women’s bodies, gay men, straight...

read more

Fujoshi Emergent: Shifting Popular Representations of Yaoi/BL Fandom in Japan

Jeffry T. Hester

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 169-188

The neologism fujoshi is playfully derived from a homophone in Japanese referring politely to “women” or “women and girls.” By a wry replacement of the Sino-Japanese character for “woman” with one used in compounds for “putrid,” “corrupt,” or “decayed,” this self-mocking appellation for “a rotten or depraved girl(s)” has been created as an inclusive term for the female fandom...

read more

Do Heterosexual Men Dream of Homosexual Men?: BL Fudanshi and Discourse on Male Feminization

Kazumi Nagaike

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 189-209

The contemporary understanding in Japan of BL (boys love) media as a female-oriented product is epitomized by the word “fujoshi,” or “rotten girl(s).”1 These BL media—namely, media focused on male–male romance narratives—have recently received a significant increase in public attention. This is in no small part due to the popularization in the mainstream media...

read more

Representational Appropriation and the Autonomy of Desire in Yaoi/BL

Ishida Hitoshi, Katsuhiko Suganuma

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 210-232

How are we to comprehend yaoi and BL? Yaoi and BL, in essence, represent a range of practices through which intimacies between men can be redrawn and redefined. How shall we interpret the meanings of love, romance, sex, marriage, and childbearing carried out by male couples? The debate over whether the relationships described in yaoi and BL represent either the...

read more

Queering the Cooking Man: Food and Gender in Yoshinaga Fumi’s (BL) Manga

Tomoko Aoyama

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 233-252

No one is perhaps more gender-conscious, and more widely acclaimed as such, among leading contemporary manga artists than Yoshinaga Fumi (1971–). Her ongoing work The Inner Chambers (Ōoku) has been awarded not only major manga awards but also the Sense of Gender Award (2005) and the James Tiptree, Jr., Award (2009), both of which are given to “science...

read more

Regulation of Manga Content in Japan: What Is the Future for BL?

Mark McLelland

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 253-273

For anyone whose only knowledge of how sexuality is variously represented in Japanese popular culture is based on reports in the English-language press, the general impression will probably be one of a sexually very open, even unrestrained society. Certainly this is the impression given in the many hyperbolic reports by Western journalists who have penned endless articles...

Works Cited

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 274-292

read more

About the Contributors

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 293-296

Tomoko Aoyama is an associate professor in Japanese at the University of Queensland, Australia. Her monograph Reading Food in Modern Japanese Literature (2008) was awarded the Asian Studies Association of Australia’s Mid-Career Researcher Prize (2010). She edited Girl Reading Girl in Japan (with Barbara Hartley; 2010), and guest edited the special issues...

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 297-303