In this Book

summary
The third installment in the landmark LAVIS (Language Variety in the South) series, New Perspectives on Language Variety in the South: Historical and Contemporary Approaches brings together essays devoted to the careful examination and elucidation of the rich linguistic diversity of the American South, updating and broadening the work of the earlier volumes by more fully capturing the multifaceted configuration of languages and dialects in the South.
 
Beginning with an introduction to American Indian languages of the Southeast, five fascinating essays discuss indigenous languages, including Caddo, Ofo, and Timucua, and evidence for the connection between the Pre-Columbian Southeast and the Caribbean.
 
Five essays explore the earlier Englishes of the South, covering topics such as the eighteenth century as the key period in the differentiation of Southern American English and the use of new quantitative methods to trace the transfer of linguistic features from England to America. They examine a range of linguistic resources, such as plantation overseers’ writings, modern blues lyrics, linguistic databases, and lexical and locutional compilations that reveal the region’s distinctive dialectal traditions.
 
New Perspectives on Language Variety in the South: Historical and Contemporary Approaches widens the scope of inquiry into the linguistic influences of the African diaspora as evidenced in primary sources and records. A comprehensive essay redefines the varieties of French in Louisiana, tracing the pathway from Colonial Louisiana to the emergence of Plantation Society French in a diglossic relationship with Louisiana Creole. A further essay maps the shift from French to English in family documents.
 
An assortment of essays on English in the contemporary South touch on an array of compelling topics from discourse strategies to dialectal emblems of identity to stereotypes in popular perception.
 
Essays about recent Latino immigrants to the South bring the collection into the twenty-first century, taking into account the dramatic increase in the population of Spanish speakers and illuminating the purported role of “Spanglish,” the bilingual lives of Spanish-speaking Latinos in Mississippi, and the existence of regional Spanish dialectal diversity.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-viii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-x
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 1. Introduction
  2. Michael D. Picone and Catherine Evans Davies
  3. pp. 1-16
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Part I. Historical Approaches
  2. pp. 17-18
  1. Indigenous Languages
  2. pp. 19-20
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 2. American Indian Languages of the Southeast: An Introduction
  2. Pamela Munro
  3. pp. 21-42
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 3. A Profile of the Caddo Language
  2. Wallace Chafe
  3. pp. 43-51
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 4. The Ofo Language of Louisiana: Recovery of Grammar and Typology
  2. Robert L. Rankin
  3. pp. 52-71
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 5. Timucua -ta: Muskogean Parallels
  2. George Aaron Broadwell
  3. pp. 72-81
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 6. Pre-Columbian Links to the Caribbean: Evidence Connecting Cusabo to Taíno
  2. Blair A. Rudes
  3. pp. 82-94
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Early Englishes of the South
  2. pp. 95-96
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 7. The Crucial Century for English in the American South
  2. Michael B. Montgomery
  3. pp. 97-117
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 8. Southern American English in Perspective: A Quantitative Comparison with Other English and American Dialects
  2. Robert Shackleton
  3. pp. 118-148
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 9. Some Developments in Southern American English Grammar
  2. Jan Tillery
  3. pp. 149-165
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 10. Francis Lieber’s Americanisms as an Early Source on Southern Speech
  2. Stuart Davis
  3. pp. 166-181
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 11. Earlier Southern Englishes in Black and White
  2. Edgar W. Schneider
  3. pp. 182-200
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. The African Diaspora
  2. pp. 201-202
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 12. Some Early Creole-Like Data from Slave Speakers: The Island of St. Helena, 1695–1711
  2. Laura Wright
  3. pp. 203-218
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 13. Regional Variation in Nineteenth-Century African American English
  2. Gerard Van Herk
  3. pp. 219-232
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 14. Prima Facie Evidence for the Persistence of Creole Features in African American English and Evidence for Residual Creole
  2. David Sutcliffe
  3. pp. 233-253
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 15. The Linguistic Status of Gullah-Geechee: Divergent Phonological Processes
  2. Thomas B. Klein
  3. pp. 254-264
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Earlier French of the Gulf South
  2. pp. 265-266
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 16. French Dialects of Louisiana: A Revised Typology
  2. Michael D. Picone
  3. pp. 267-287
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 17. From French to English in Louisiana: The Prudhomme Family’s Story
  2. Connie C. Eble
  3. pp. 288-296
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Part II. Contemporary Approaches
  2. pp. 297-298
  1. Across the South
  2. pp. 299-300
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 18. The South in DARE Revisited
  2. Joan Houston Hall and Luanne von Schneidemesser
  3. pp. 301-310
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 19. The South: Still Different
  2. Dennis R. Preston
  3. pp. 311-326
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 20. Demography as Destiny? Population Change and the Future of Southern American English
  2. Guy Bailey
  3. pp. 327-350
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. English in the Contemporary South: Persistence and Change
  2. pp. 351-352
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 21. A Century of Sound Change in Alabama
  2. Crawford Feagin
  3. pp. 353-368
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 22. Various Variation Aggregates in the LAMSAS South
  2. John Nerbonne
  3. pp. 369-382
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 23. The Persistence of Dialect Features
  2. Sylvie Dubois and Barbara Horvath
  3. pp. 383-396
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. English in the Contemporary South: Discourse Approaches
  2. pp. 397-398
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 24. Southern Storytelling: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives
  2. Catherine Evans Davies
  3. pp. 399-421
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 25. The Southernand Southwestern DiscourseStyles of Two Texas Women
  2. Judith M. Bean
  3. pp. 422-432
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 26. We Ain’t Done Yet: Dialect Depiction and Language Ideology
  2. Rachel Shuttlesworth Thompson
  3. pp. 433-446
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. English in the Contemporary South: African American Language Issues
  2. pp. 447-448
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 27. Race, Racialism, and the Study of Language Evolution in America
  2. Salikoko Mufwene
  3. pp. 449-474
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 28. The Language of Black Women in the Smoky Mountain Region of Appalachia
  2. Christine Mallinson and Becky Childs
  3. pp. 475-491
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 29. The Sound Symbolism of Self in Innovative Naming Practices in an African American Community
  2. Janis B. Nuckolls and Linda Beito
  3. pp. 492-504
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. English in the Contemporary South: Black and White Speech and the Complexities of Relationship
  2. pp. 505-506
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 30. An Experiment on Cues Used for Identification of Voices as African American or European American
  2. Erik R. Thomas and Jeffrey Reaser
  3. pp. 507-522
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 31. What We Hear and What It Expresses: The Perception and Meaning of Vowel Differences among Dialects
  2. Valerie Fridland and Kathryn Bartlett
  3. pp. 523-535
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 32. A Quantitative Acoustic Approach to /ai/ Glide-Weakening among Detroit African American and Appalachian White Southern Migrants
  2. Bridget L. Anderson
  3. pp. 536-550
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 33. The Spread of the cot/caught Merger in the Speech of Memphians: An Ethnolinguistic Marker?
  2. Valerie Fridland
  3. pp. 551-564
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 34. Phonological Variation in Louisiana ASL: An Exploratory Study
  2. Robert Bayley and Ceil Lucas
  3. pp. 565-580
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. English in the Contemporary South:Language and Identity
  2. pp. 581-582
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 35. Constructing Identity: The Use of a-Prefixing and Nonstandard Past Tense in Narration to Create a Community Voice
  2. Allison Burkette
  3. pp. 583-590
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 36. Negotiating Linguistic Capital in Economic Decline: Dialect Change in Mill Villager and Farmer Speech
  2. Lisa D. McNair
  3. pp. 591-608
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 37. Lexical Features of Jewish English in the Southern United States
  2. Cynthia Bernstein
  3. pp. 609-624
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Louisiana French
  2. pp. 625-626
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 38. Beyond Cajun: Toward an Expanded View of Regional French in Louisiana
  2. Thomas A. Klingler
  3. pp. 627-640
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 39. Whither Cajun French: Language Persistence and Dialectal Upsurges
  2. Sylvie Dubois
  3. pp. 641-654
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Latino Language Issues
  2. pp. 655-656
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 40. Is “Spanglish” the Third Language of the South? Truth and Fantasy about US Spanish
  2. John M. Lipski
  3. pp. 657-677
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 41. Language Acquisition and Social Integration of Hispanics in Northeast Mississippi
  2. Patricia Manning Lestrade
  3. pp. 678-695
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 42. Puerto Rican Spanish in South Texas: Variation in Subject Personal Pronouns
  2. Carlos Martin Vélez Salas, Belinda Treviño Schouten, Norma Cárdenas, and Robert Bayley
  3. pp. 696-712
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Language in the Southand the Public Interest
  2. pp. 713-714
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 43. Stylization, Aging, and Cultural Competence: Why Health Care in the South Needs Linguistics
  2. Boyd Davis and Dena Shenk
  3. pp. 715-730
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 44. Sociolinguistic Engagement in Community Perspective
  2. Walt Wolfram
  3. pp. 731-747
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Conclusion: Perspectives, Achievements, and Remaining Challenges
  2. Walt Wolfram
  3. pp. 748-770
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 771-772
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 773-813
  3. restricted access Download |

Additional Information

ISBN
9780817387365
Related ISBN
9780817318154
MARC Record
OCLC
904249458
Pages
824
Launched on MUSE
2015-03-03
Language
English
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.