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New York City stands as the first expression of the modern city, a mosaic of disparate neighborhoods born in 1898 with the amalgamation of the five boroughs and shaped by the passions of developers and regulators, architects and engineers, politicians and reformers, immigrant entrepreneurs and corporate builders. Through their labor, their ideals, and their often fierce battles, the physical and social dimensions—the landscape—of the modern city were forged. The original essays in The Landscape of Modernity tell the compelling story of the growth of New York City from 1900 to 1940, from the beginnings of its skyscraper skyline to the expanding reaches of suburbanization.

At the beginning of the century, New York City was already one of the world's leading corporate and commercial centers. The Zoning Ordinance of 1916, initially proposed by Fifth Avenue merchants as a means of halting the uptown spread of the garment industry, became the nation's first comprehensive zoning law and the proving ground for a new occupation—the urban planner. During the 1920s, frenzied development created a vertical metamorphosis in Manhattan's booming business district, culminating in its most spectacularly modern icon, the Empire State Building. The city also spread laterally, with the controversial development of subway systems and the creation of the powerful Port of New York Authority, whose new bridges and tunnels decentralized the population and industry of New York. New York's older ethnic enclaves were irrevocably altered by this new urban landscape: the Lower East Side's Jewish community was nearly dismantled by the flight of the garment industry and the attractiveness of new suburbs, while Little Italy fought government forces eager to homogenize commercial use of the streets by eliminating the traditional pushcart peddlers.

Illustrated with striking photographs and maps, The Landscape of Modernity links important scenes of growth and development to the larger political, economic, social, and cultural processes of the early twentieth century.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title, Copyright, Frontmatter
  2. pp. 2i-vi
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. p. ix
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  1. Notes on Contributors
  2. pp. x-xii
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  1. List of Illustrations
  2. pp. xiii-xiv
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  1. Part I. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-2
  1. Chapter 1. Between Rationalism and Pluralism: Creating the Modern City
  2. David Ward and Olivier Zunz
  3. pp. 3-16
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  1. Part II. Planning for New York City
  2. pp. 17-18
  1. Chapter 2. Regulating the Landscape: Real Estate Values, City Planning, and the 1916 Zoning Ordinance
  2. Keith D. Revell
  3. pp. 19-45
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  1. Chapter 3. Density and Intervention: New York's Planning Traditions
  2. Marc A. Weiss
  3. pp. 46-75
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  1. Chapter 4. Joining New York City to the Greater Metropolis: The Port Authority as Visionary, Target of Opportunity, and Opportunist
  2. Jameson W. Doig
  3. pp. 76-105
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  1. Chapter 5. The Regional Plan and the Transformation of the Industrial Metropolis
  2. Robert Fishman
  3. pp. 106-126
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  1. Part III. Building the Vertical City
  2. pp. 127-128
  1. Chapter 6. Corporate Identity and the New York Office Building: 1895-1915
  2. Gail Fenske and Deryck Holdsworth
  3. pp. 129-159
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  1. Chapter 7. Form Follows Finance: The Empire State Building
  2. Carol Willis
  3. pp. 160-188
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  1. Part IV. Going from Home to Work
  2. pp. 189-190
  1. Chapter 8. Subways, Transit Politics, and Metropolitan Spatial Expansion
  2. Clifton Hood
  3. pp. 191-212
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  1. Chapter 9. Sweatshop Migrations: The Garment Industry Between Home and Shop
  2. Nancy L. Green
  3. pp. 213-232
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  1. Part V. Fighting for Identity
  2. pp. 233-234
  1. Chapter 10. Little Italy's Decline: Immigrant Renters and Investors in a Changing City
  2. Donna Gabaccia
  3. pp. 235-251
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  1. Chapter 11. On the Fringes of the City: Jewish Neighborhoods in Three Boroughs
  2. Deborah Dash Moore
  3. pp. 252-272
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  1. Chapter 12. Cities of Light, Landscapes of Pleasure
  2. David Nasaw
  3. pp. 273-286
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  1. Chapter 13. "The Pushcart Evil"
  2. Daniel Bluestone
  3. pp. 287-312
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  1. Part VI. Completing the Landscape
  2. pp. 313-314
  1. Chapter 14. Fiorello H. LaGuardia and the Challenge of Democratic Planning
  2. Thomas Kessner
  3. pp. 315-330
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  1. Selected References
  2. pp. 331-342
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 343-370
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781610445504
Related ISBN
9780871549006
MARC Record
OCLC
906809560
Pages
384
Launched on MUSE
2016-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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