In this Book

summary

How diverse can, and should, TV programming be? And especially, in what precise ways does governmental regulation of TV affect (or fail to affect) the programs station owners produce—programs which, in the final analysis, shape in such large measure the values of Americans? It is to these timely and beguiling questions that Harvey Levin addresses his dispassionate assessment of the complex relationship between government and the TV industry. Analyzing data drawn from the history of the FCC's regulatory decisions, as well as from interviews with numerous government and industry officials, Professor Levin shows how the present form of restrictive governmental regulation almost always results in higher profits and rents for TV stations, with no concomitant increase in programming diversity.

In addition, Professor Levin investigates various other aspects of the media market, from the particular kinds of crucial decisions that are made when, for example, a newspaper owns a TV station, to the kinds of problems that arise when commercial rents are taxed to fund public TV; from the brand of programming we are offered when a monopoly controls a given TV market to the nature of programming in a situation of steady and fair competition. Following a comprehensive assessment, the author makes a compelling case for diversification of station ownership, in order to be "safe rather than sorry." He also argues for the entry of new stations, more extensive support of public TV, and some form of quantitative program requirements—all of which will help bring about greater program diversity.

Professor Levin's volume provides us with a fully documented and sharply focused analysis of the theories, policies, and problems of one of the most powerful and misunderstood of contemporary institutions.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-x
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  1. Tables
  2. pp. xi-xv
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xvi-2
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  1. 1. Scope and Method
  2. pp. 3-22
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  1. Part I: Basic Framework
  2. pp. 23-24
  1. 2. Economic Structure and Regulatory Framework
  2. pp. 25-51
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  1. 3. The Concept and Measurement of Diversity
  2. pp. 52-101
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  1. 4. Origin and Incidence of Economic Rents in Broadcasting
  2. pp. 102-136
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  1. 5. Objectives versus Results in Federal Broadcast Regulation
  2. pp. 137-160
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  1. Part II: A Critique of Current Policies
  2. pp. 161-162
  1. 6. The Policy on Ownership Diversity
  2. pp. 163-208
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  1. 7. The Cross-Ownership Proceeding: A Case Study in Factual Deficiencies
  2. pp. 209-240
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  1. 8. Structural Diversity, Owner Diversity, and the Role of Public Television: A Comparative Assessment
  2. pp. 241-275
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  1. 9. Alleged Bases of National Television Network Power
  2. pp. 276-297
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  1. 10. The Limits of Network Regulation
  2. pp. 298-322
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  1. 11. Objectives versus Consequences in Prime-Time Access
  2. pp. 323-340
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  1. Part III: Assessment of Selected Alternatives
  2. pp. 341-342
  1. 12. A Note on the Regulatory Implications of Scarcity Rents in Television
  2. pp. 343-348
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  1. 13. Quantitative Program Requirements
  2. pp. 349-384
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  1. 14. The Use of Scarcity Rents to Fund Public Broadcasting
  2. pp. 385-412
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  1. Appendix I: Basic Methodological Issues
  2. pp. 413-432
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  1. Appendix II: Principal Estimating Equations
  2. pp. 433-494
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  1. Name Index
  2. pp. 495-496
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  1. Subject Index
  2. pp. 497-505
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781610443517
Related ISBN
9780871545312
MARC Record
OCLC
907642593
Pages
523
Launched on MUSE
2016-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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