Cover

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Title page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

List of illustrations

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pp. vii-viii

Maps

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pp. ix-xiv

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1. Introduction

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pp. 1-16

An outpouring of books, articles and film in the last decade as well as an impressive memorial on Washington, DCs Mall have demonstrated that the Korean War (1950-53) is no longer quite "The Forgotten War", "The Unknown War", or "The War Before Vietnam". But this conflict has never...

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2. History and background

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pp. 17-46

On 25 June 1950, President Harry Truman, having opened the new Baltimore —Washington airport in one of the more meaningless routines inflicted on heads of state, was flying to Missouri for a weekend with his family. His recorded thoughts at the time were of domestic matters. In fact, in that halcyon...

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3. Invasion and retreat

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pp. 47-74

In the rain-soaked early hours of Sunday, 25 June 1950 (Korean time), tankled North Korean troops, preceded by a heavy artillery bombardment and supported by air power, launched a full-scale invasion of the Republic of Korea. To be fair, the DPRK interpretation should be given: "Using the Syngman...

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4. The Pusan Perimeter

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pp. 75-84

Total US ground units strength at this time stood at approximately 45,000 troops. The combat strength of the Army of the ROK at the same time numbered 47,000. The troop strength of the KPA probably stood then at no more than 70,000. This disparity does not take into account the UN Command's...

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5. Inchon landings and pursuit northward

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pp. 85-94

General MacArthur had planned to put his 1st Cavalry Division ashore at Inchon well behind KPA lines as early as 22 July. Here he was certainly guilty of the most gross optimism or ignorance, for such planning had to be abandoned on 10 July as US and ROK forces continued to stream southward...

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6. The UNC drive north

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pp. 95-116

With UNC forces firmly ashore at Inchon, their next mission was to retake Seoul. The North Koreans did attempt a hesitant counter-stroke on 16 September 1950. A column of 16 T-34-85 tanks moved down the main road to Inchon to interdict UNC forces; all the tanks were destroyed, half by Marine...

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7. China's intervention and the second great UN retreat

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pp. 117-128

As the US Army liaison light aircraft dipped low over the wind-swept, snow-clad wastes of wintertime North Korea, relief suddenly became palpable in the cockpit. The long-overdue Army convoy had been spotted. It was easy enough to see, with its olive-drab trucks in startling contrast to the whiteness...

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8. Chinese offensives and stabilization of the battlelines

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pp. 129-148

To the west, Eighth Army, in considerably more disorder than X Corps in the northeast, retreated overland southward. On 5 December Pyongyang was evacuated and the city left in flames, but there is no evidence that the UNC deliberately fired the capital. Although the DPRJC capital is an inland...

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9. The United Nations' first war

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pp. 149-170

The Korean War was the first and only protracted conflict conducted under the auspices of the UN. All other UN military ventures have been to separate belligerants and to maintain that separation. They have all been on a much smaller scale than the Korean conflict. In Korea the moral authority...

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10. The air and naval war

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pp. 171-196

The air war in Korea was a juxtaposition of the old and the new. The latest models of jet fighter-interceptors clashed over the Yalu River, while over the land battlefields Second World War-design Mustang, Corsair, Skyraider, or Firefly propeller fighters shot up Communist trucks and bunkers. The US Air...

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11. Behind the lines

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pp. 197-222

Among the most pressing problems behind the lines — and along them at times, for that matter — was that of civilian refugees. During the Second World War in Europe, the US and British Armies had developed an effective apparatus for taking care of these unfortunates. By the end of that war, some 25,000...

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12. Home fronts

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pp. 223-238

The Korean War bore most harshly on the home fronts of North and South Korea. Nonetheless, the DPRK's wartime experience remains closed to any objective analysis by the lack of open archives.
In South Korea the problem is not so much a lack of documentation, although...

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13. Fighting and negotiating

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pp. 239-262

By the early summer of 1951 even Mao conceded that the time for large-scale offensives, at least for the moment, was past and that his armies must go over to "piecemeal" warfare. He cabled Peng that
The [immediate] past campaigns have shown that our enveloping...

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14. Conclusions

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pp. 263-270

The Korean War itself was primarily a conventional conflict. Nuclear weapons, which featured so dominantly in those late 1940s' "War of Tomorrow" scenarios, both official and popular, were, of course, not employed. Few, if any, "push-button" weapons were deployed. (Senator Brian McMahon remarked at...

Notes

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pp. 271-278

Select bibliography

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pp. 279-312

Chronology

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pp. 313-322

Index

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pp. 323-332