Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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Foreword

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pp. v-viii

The purpose of this study is to present a history of the Negro who has come to France, the reasons for his coming, the record of his stay, and the reactions of the French to his presence. It is not a study of the Negro in the French colonies...

Contents

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pp. ix-x

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Introduction

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pp. 1-10

A distinguished Negro leader in the United States has remarked that the outstanding problem of the twentieth century is that of the "color line" (the relationship of the light and dark races). Although it is not of the gravity...

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1. Earliest Negro Arrivals

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pp. 11-24

In Europe of the ancient Graeco-Roman world, Negroes were rarities; it was in the medieval period that they first appeared in numbers. Many came to Constantinople in the sixth and seventh centuries A.D., both as...

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2. Influx of Colonial Slaves

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pp. 25-42

The Memoir of Mellier, written in the spring of 1716, was one of several submitted to the government, possibly at its own solicitation. Remarkably enough, all of its suggestions were set forth in an Edict of October, 1716...

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3. A Negro Problem in France

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pp. 43-62

How did one reconcile the internal policy on slavery and the policy for the colonies which France pursued during the 1700's? This was a live question and many felt very strongly about it. Slavery in theory had...

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4. Liberation and Politics

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pp. 63-85

The French Revolution came as a boon to the Negro, whether slave or free. It espoused the rights of the common man; it proclaimed liberty, equality, and fraternity; from an early date it declared all men equal before...

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5. Wearing the Uniform

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pp. 86-111

Records of Negroes serving in the French army are found dating back to the late 1600's. Moreau de Saint-Mery tells of a Captain Vincent Ollivier, a freedman from Santo Domingo, being buried on the island...

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6. Social Aspects of the Revolution

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pp. 112-123

Much allusion to social conditions has been made in previous chapters, but it has been brought in incidentally and other phases have not been mentioned-how the Negroes of the era lived, how the Revolution aided...

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7. Under Slavery Again

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pp. 124-144

The Napoleonic order of May 20, 1802, restoring slavery as of 1789 in the French colonies had less significance before the Congress of Vienna than afterward. As for Santo Domingo, it was never put into...

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8. A New Day in Politics

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pp. 145-158

The Second French Republic brought a new opportunity for Negroes to participate in politics. Under the First Republic several had come to Paris and sat in the National Convention and the Legislative Corps...

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9. Literary Activities

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pp. 159-187

The desire to write has animated a large number of French Negroes, and it is surprising how many have been successful-surprising because many have had little formal education, surprising because most...

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10. Serving under the Tricolor

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pp. 188-203

In an earlier chapter the story has been told of Negro participation in French wars since the middle of the eighteenth century, sometimes fighting as units, sometimes as isolated soldiers in white units, often...

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11. To France for an Education

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pp. 204-227

There are no summary figures for Negroes who have studied in France, whether in the past or at present, and the acquisition of information on such students is difficult, due in part to the increasing...

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12. Entertainment and Sports

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pp. 228-241

While education is the greatest magnet drawing Negroes to France, there are also others, some professional, some diversionary. The most influential is music. Jazz, spirituals, and even classical music...

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13. Other Social Aspects

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pp. 242-254

"With thirty or forty thousand Negroes in France,1 one will find most of the aspects of modern society presented, from riches to poverty, from pleasures to vice and crime. Yet the evidence is fragmentary...

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14. In Bigtime Politics

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pp. 255-270

Since 1789, Negroes have participated in French politics and shown themselves remarkably adept at it. Raimond and other mulattoes of the Amis des Noirs were successful in obtaining various advantages for...

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The Future Outlook

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pp. 271-274

It is difficult for those who have not been to France to visualize the status of the Negroes there. Rarely are they servants. Most are of the middle class and to some degree approximate American students...

Index

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pp. 275-278