Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Foreword

Taiaiake Alfred

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pp. ix-xii

Not so very long ago, in Canada there numbered just less than fourteen million inhabitants: thirteen million human beings, and half a million Natives. The former had the land; the others had the memory of it. Between the two there were hired chiefs, an Indian Affairs bureaucracy, and a small bourgeoisie, all...

Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xiv

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Introduction. Subjects of Empire

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pp. 1-24

Over the last forty years, the self-determination efforts and objectives of Indigenous peoples in Canada have increasingly been cast in the language of “recognition.”1 Consider, for example, the formative declaration issued by my people in 1975: ...

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1. The Politics of Recognition in Colonial Contexts

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pp. 25-50

My introductory chapter began by making two broad claims: first, I claimed that since 1969 we have witnessed the modus operandi of colonial power relations in Canada shift from a more or less unconcealed structure of domination to a form of colonial governance that works through...

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2. For the Land: The Dene Nation’s Struggle for Self-Determination

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pp. 51-78

As suggested in my introduction and chapter 1, one of the problems most commonly associated with the politics of recognition has to do with the ways in which it has, at times, shown to be insufficiently informed by “a sociological understanding of power relations.”1 For self-proclaimed...

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3. Essentialism and the Gendered Politics of Aboriginal Self-Government

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pp. 79-104

In this chapter I explore in detail the second cluster of concerns often associated with the politics of recognition briefly identified in my introductory chapter. These criticisms have tended to focus on the empirically problematic and normatively suspect character of recognition claims based on “essentialist”...

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4. Seeing Red: Reconciliation and Resentment

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pp. 105-130

On June 11, 2008, the Conservative prime minister of Canada, Stephen J. Harper, issued an official apology on behalf of the Canadian state to Indigenous survivors of the Indian residential school system.1 Characterized as the inauguration of a “new chapter” in the history of Aboriginal–non-Aboriginal...

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5. The Plunge into the Chasm of the Past: Fanon, Self-Recognition, and Decolonization

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pp. 131-150

This chapter begins to sketch out in more detail the alternative politics of recognition briefly introduced at the end of chapter 1. As suggested there, far from evading the recognition paradigm entirely, Fanon instead turns our attention to the cultural practices of critical individual and collective...

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Conclusion. Lessons from Idle No More: The Future of Indigenous Activism

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pp. 151-180

In writing this book I set out to problematize the increasingly commonplace assumption that the colonial relationship between Indigenous peoples and the Canadian state can be reconciled via a liberal “politics of recognition.” I characterized the “politics of recognition” as a recognition-based approach to...

Notes

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pp. 181-220

Index, About the Author

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pp. 221-230