Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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List of Illustrations

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pp. vii-viii

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Editors’ Introduction

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pp. ix-xiv

We begin by apologizing to our readers for the recent hiatus in publication of our ostensibly annual publication. Histories of Anthropology Annual began in the University of Nebraska book division and moved to the journals category aft er it had established reasonable visibility...

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1. “China to the Anthropologist”: Franz Boas, Berthold Laufer, and a Road Not Taken in Early American Anthropology

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pp. 1-40

“I shall place the ethnography and archaeology of this country on an entirely new and solid basis, that I shall conquer China to the anthropologist. China no longer the exclusive domain of travelers and sinologues, both narrow- minded and one- sided in their standpoints and...

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2. A. M. Hocart: Reflections on a Master Ethnologist and His Work

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pp. 41-68

Arthur Maurice Hocart (1883–1939), better known as A. M. Hocart, was a British sociocultural anthropologist living and working in the same era as A. R. Radcliffe-Brown and Bronislaw Malinowski. Yet despite his extensive ethnographic fieldwork, scientific sophistication, and prolific...

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3. Malinowski and the “Native Question”

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pp. 69-110

In Europe, social anthropology is a major social science that can now boast thousands of participants. This was not the case in the 1920s and 1930s, when the number of professional, university-trained anthropologists was limited to a few dozen individuals (Goody 1995; Kuper...

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4. Radcliffe-Brown and “Applied Anthropology” at Cape Town and Sydney

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pp. 111-140

A. R. Radcliffe-Brown (1881–1955) was one of the founders of modern social anthropology. His published output was not large, but it was influential. His reputation was probably greater through his teaching and personal contacts, for he was a compelling lecturer with an...

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5. “The Department Was in Some Disarray”: The Politics of Choosing a Successor to S. F. Nadel, 1957

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pp. 141-172

On the unexpected and sudden death of S. F. Nadel in January 1956, at the comparatively young age of fifty-two, the Australian National University (ANU) needed to find a new professor of anthropology in the Research School of Pacific Studies (RSPacS).1 It was keen to find...

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6. An Elegy for a Structuralist Legacy: Lévi-Strauss, Cultural Relativism, and the Universal Capacities of the Human Mind

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pp. 173-182

Structuralism, whatever that term may mean over a decade into the twenty-first century, is overdue for reassessment. The death of Claude Lévi-Strauss in 2009 provides the obligation as well as the opportunity to engage in such an exercise of historical retrospect. Lévi-Strauss...

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7. Lévi-Strauss’s Approach to Systems of Classification: Categories in Northwest Coast Cultures

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pp. 183-192

Lévi-Strauss, in the first paragraph of The Savage Mind, refers to Franz Boas’s discussion in the Introduction to the Handbook of American Indian Languages. Though many scholars once maintained that native people lacked the capacity for “abstract thought,” Lévi-Strauss agreed with...

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8. Lévi-Strauss on Theoretical Thought and Universal History

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pp. 193-208

Claude Lévi-Strauss is oft en accused of paying too little regard for history and human agency. But this is misguided, for as the above quote shows, Lévi-Strauss, notwithstanding the importance he attached to the study of the unconscious mind, clearly felt that history and agency...

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9. Historical Massacres and Mythical Totalities: Reading Marshall Sahlins on Two American Frontiers

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pp. 209-248

Historical events, as opposed to trends and processes, have always been difficult to capture in a “scientific” frame. Trends and processes can be explained, in principle, by feedback mechanisms such as self-regulating markets and balances of power. Indeed, simple homeostatic...

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10. Anthropologists as Perpetrators and Perpetuators of Oral Tradition: The Lectures of Kenelm O. L. Burridge and Robin Ridington, Storytellers

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pp. 249-270

The discipline of anthropology is abundant with narratives by and about anthropologists, their unique research projects, their academic philosophies, and their theoretical approaches or contributions. I present here an unpublished 1988 student assignment as a conduit for my...

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Book Reviews

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pp. 271-278

History of Anthropology (HOA) is not the central feature of the volume series Th e French Colonial Mind. Yet HOA is evident throughout the diverse chapters, providing a topical intersection of both anthropology and the French colonial mind. Altogether, anthropological personalities...

Contributors

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p. 279