Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

Quote

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pp. vii-2

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Preamble

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pp. 3-8

The subtitle should not mislead: Not all catastrophes are equivalent, not in amplitude, not in destructiveness, not in consequences. A tsunami without repercussions for a nuclear installation is not the same as a tsunami that seriously damages a nuclear plant...

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1

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pp. 9-11

“To philosophize after Fukushima”—that is the mandate I was given for this conference.1 Its wording inevitably makes me think of Adorno’s: “To write poetry after Auschwitz.” There are considerable differences between the two. They are not the differences...

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2

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pp. 12-14

What is common to both these names, Auschwitz and Hiroshima, is a crossing of limits—not the limits of morality, or of politics, or of humanity in the sense of a feeling for human dignity, but the limits of existence and of a world where humanity exists, that...

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3

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pp. 15-16

As soon as we undertake this bringing together, this continuity, a contradiction seems to arise: The military atom is not the civilian atom; an enemy attack is not a country’s electrical grid. It is here that the grating poetry of this vexatious rhyme opens onto...

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4

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pp. 17-20

Let us start again from what these two testimonies tell us: Civilization, irremediable? Civilization of the irremediable or an irremediable civilization? I think, in fact, that the question of after Fukushima is posed in these terms. They are, moreover, more or...

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5

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pp. 21-23

What Fukushima adds to Hiroshima is the threat of an apocalypse that opens onto nothing, onto the negation of the apocalypse itself, a threat that depends not just on military use of the atom and perhaps not even on the sole use of the atom in general. Actually, these...

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6

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pp. 24-26

With equivalence and the incalculable we have already extended our perspective beyond nuclear use by the military. In fact, with these two features we can characterize not just the general use of nuclear energy but, even more widely, the nature of the general...

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7

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pp. 27-29

The incommensurability of the same and the other cannot be related to the incalculability of what challenges our power to decide. No one can truly calculate the consequences of Fukushima, for humans, for the region, the earth, the streams, and the sea, for...

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8

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pp. 30-32

Fukushima is a powerfully exemplary event because it shows the close and brutal connections between a seismic quake, a dense population, and a nuclear installation (under inadequate management). It is also exemplary of a node of complex relationships between...

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9

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pp. 33-37

Now we have come beyond the meaning that Marx gave his phrase. For him, the equivalence of money could be demystified in favor of the living reality of a production whose social truth is the creation of true humanity. That was for him the historical...

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10

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pp. 38-42

The present I evoke thus is not the present of the immediate, that of the pure and simple inert position where reason and desire are fixed in stupor or in repletion, without past or future, nor is it one of the fleeting or lightning-quick instant of decision, that exemplary...

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Questions for Jean-Luc Nancy

Yuji Nishiyama and Yotetsu Tonaki

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pp. 43-50

Y.N. AND Y.T.: The Japanese translation of your book After Fukushima had quite an impact on Japan, since it’s the fi rst sincere, valuable response by a foreign philosopher to Fukushima. After the catastrophe in Fukushima, your book...

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It’s a Catastrophe!: Interview with Jean-Luc Nancy

Danielle Cohen-Levinas

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pp. 51-60

D.C.-L.: In a book you called After Fukushima: The Equivalence of Catastrophes, which you wrote in 2012, after the Fukushima catastrophe, you write:
The “equivalence” of catastrophes here means to assert that the spread or proliferation of repercussions from...

Notes

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pp. 61-64