In this Book

summary

Examining its relation to ancient and Renaissance political thought, George M. Logan sees Thomas More's Utopia whole, in all its ironic complexity. He finds that the book is not primarily a prescriptive work that restates the ideals of Christian humanism or warns against radical idealism, but an exploration of a particular method of political study and the implications of that method for normative theory.

Originally published in 1983.

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Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. i-vi
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. ix-xviii
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  1. Prolegomena
  2. pp. 3-18
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  1. 1. The Letter to Giles
  2. pp. 19-31
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  1. 2. Europe
  2. pp. 32-130
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  1. 3. Utopia
  2. pp. 131-253
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  1. Epilogue
  2. pp. 254-270
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  1. Works Cited
  2. pp. 271-288
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 289-297
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781400855872
MARC Record
OCLC
889254643
Pages
320
Launched on MUSE
2015-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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