Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Series Page, Copyright, Quotations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Table of Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

...history of humanitarian interventions. His encouragement convinced me to abandon my previous field of research and undertake this intellectual venture. Bruno Arcidiacono and Matthew Leitner rescued me whenever I found myself...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-17

...scientists is a little bit like crying ‘fire’ in a crowded theatre: it can create a clear and present danger to everyone within earshot.” Keohane does not even mention historians, who, with regard to this topic, have always been conspicuous by their...

read more

Chapter One: The International Context of Nineteenth-Century Humanitarian Interventions

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 18-35

...intervention emerged as a particular kind of intervention and why this international practice took place in a particular geographical area, the Ottoman Empire (the target state), and geopolitical context, when Ottoman Christians were victims of massacre...

read more

Chapter Two: Exclusion of the Ottoman Empire from the Family of Nations, and Legal Doctrines of Humanitarian Intervention

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 36-62

...Great Britain or to offer an account of what the Ottoman Empire was like, or even how it was seen by those who actually lived in it. I wish to underline that the image of the Ottoman Empire and that of its Christian populations were far from being monolithic. As Edward Said argues, Europeans generally saw themselves as...

read more

Chapter Three: Intervention on Behalf of Ottoman Greeks (1821–33)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 63-90

...born international system. The Congress system coexisted with the Holy Alliance (a treaty signed by the three Eastern European monarchies, Prussia, Austria, and Russia), which attempted to preserve the status quo by intervening militarily in various...

read more

Chapter Four: Intervention in Ottoman Lebanon and Syria (1860–61)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 91-117

...various locations both north and south. In Mount Lebanon local Druze and Maronite notables served as intermediaries between the Ottoman authorities and the urban population they spoke for and controlled. The autonomy of Mount Lebanon depended on a network of alliances among leading Druze and Maronite...

read more

Chapter Five: The First Intervention in Crete (1866–69)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 118-140

...determined not to help Christian Cretans—whose militancy was seen as a manifestation of the ambition of Russia and Crete—for it feared a new explosion of the “Eastern Question.” The other European governments, led by Russia and France, did intervene allegedly to the save the lives of strangers. British...

read more

Chapter Six: Nonintervention during the Eastern Crisis (1875–78)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 141-169

...Empire. The failure of the conference led to the Russo- Turkish War, which started in April 1877. It is worth clarifying from the outset that contemporary policy-makers did not consider the 1877 war as an instance of humanitarian intervention, even if humanitarian motives (the protection of Orthodox Christians)...

read more

Chapter Seven: Intermezzo—The International Context (1878–1908)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 170-184

...recognized the Ottoman Empire as an independent territorial entity, although they did not recognize its domestic sovereignty and authority structures, which they deemed ineffective and “uncivilized.” They denied the Ottoman Empire’s...

read more

Chapter Eight: Nonintervention on Behalf of the Ottoman Armenians (1886–1909)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 185-211

...into the international debate to the distress of the Ottomans. As the Ottoman Empire was pushed more and more out of Europe, the Armenians were increasingly exposed as a major...

read more

Chapter Nine: The Second Intervention in Crete (1896–1900)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 212-228

...acting against massacre. The purpose of the intervention was to help the Ottoman government restore law and order on the island after an insurgency and to avoid further threats to an increasingly...

read more

Chapter Ten: Nonforcible Intervention in the Ottoman Macedonian Provinces (1903–08)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 229-246

...nationalists thought that evidence of indiscriminate massacres and atrocities increased the likelihood of an intervention by the European powers. Macedonian nationalists drew the wrong lessons from previous interventions and did not realize that from...

read more

Epilogue

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 247-276

...Committee of Alleged German Outrages, the same James Bryce so actively involved on behalf of the Armenians and the Macedonians before the war—proclaimed German forces guilty of widespread sadistic outrages during the invasion...

Abbreviations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 277-278

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 279-344

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 345-384

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 385-392

read more

About the Series

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 393-393

...torture. Some books in the series are more historically oriented and explore particular events and their legacies. Others focus on contemporary concerns, like instances of forced population displacements or indiscriminate bombings. Still...