Book Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

List of Figures

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

List of Tables

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xii

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xiv

In policy, politics, and social science, there are two intellectual approaches to problems and debates. The first begins with an answer and then works back to evidence and the construction of a supportive logical argument. ...

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xv-xvi

This book and the research on which it is based could not have been completed without the aid of many people and several organizations. Initial funding and continuing assistance were provided by the faculty and staff of the Robert La Follette Institute of Public Affairs of the University of Wisconsin–Madison. ...

read more

1. Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-10

I am seated in the basement of a sixty-year-old school in the spring of 1991. The room is painted grayish green and it is clean, but clearly the space has been improvised for the music class I have been watching for twenty minutes. Twenty-three first-grade students sit on folding chairs. ...

read more

2. The Enduring Controversy over Educational Choice

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 11-28

Considerably more verbiage has been expended than action taken concerning private school choice in American. Modern discussions of education vouchers date to 1955 when Milton Friedman first suggested them as a way to reduce the inefficiencies and monopolistic character of public schools (Friedman, 1955). ...

read more

3. Educational Choice and the Milwaukee Voucher Program

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 29-48

In recent years a number of articles and books have been written on educational choice (Wells, 1993; Henig, 1994; Cookson, 1994; Lieberman, 1993; Witte and Rigdon, 1993; Clune and Witte, 1990). It is unnecessary to describe the programs treated in this literature in great detail because these previous works do a more than adequate job. ...

Appendix to Chapter 3: Historical MPS Achievement Test Data

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 49-51

read more

4. Who Participates in Choice Programs?

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 52-82

In this chapter I address issues that affect experiments with educational vouchers, as well as debates that are central to the structure of American education. The basic issues involve the composition of our schools and the appropriateness of allowing and supporting schools that range widely in terms of educational expectations, goals, and results for children. ...

read more

5. The Milwaukee Choice Schools

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 83-111

The private schools participating in the MPCP were not a representative sample of private schools in Milwaukee or elsewhere in the nation.1 However, the case studies and contacts I maintained with these schools over five years are still extremely valuable in understanding the character and diversity of private schools and their advantages and disadvantages when compared to public schools. ...

read more

6. Outcomes of the Milwaukee Voucher Program

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 112-151

This chapter contains a healthy portion of quantitative data on the outcomes of the Milwaukee voucher program. It also includes some nonquantitative results, which may stay longer in the minds of the reader, but unfortunately have less serious impact. ...

Appendix to Chapter 6: Modeling Selection Bias

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 152-156

read more

7. The Politics of Vouchers

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 157-189

Educational voucher advocates consistently tout the educational advantages of voucher programs. In the context of American experiments with vouchers in Milwaukee and Cleveland, advocates emphasize the benefits for poor, minority students. ...

read more

8. Implications and Conclusions

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 190-210

This study has implications for American education policy, policymaking theory, and the use of experimental policy designs. Because I wish to end with the choices we face in thinking about the future of education in America, I will begin with the more general implications of voucher policies and politics for the broader questions of policy theory. ...

References

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 211-218

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 219-221