Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Frontmatter

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Foreword

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

In seven chapters that reveal the ancestral and contemporary shape of the sacred geography of the Maya soul, Jean Molesky-Poz has elegantly interwoven the cosmic identity of our Maya culture. This culture that originated some fifteen or twenty thousand years ago believes and understands that humans and all that exists are part of an indivisible whole....

read more

Portal: At the Dawn

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xviii

At dawn on June 12, 1988, my husband, Martín, with our infant daughter on his back, and I, pregnant with our second child, pilgrimaged single-file with seventy people toward a Maya altar. Fifteen Ajq’ijab’ (spiritual guides), family members, people from Zunil and from the outskirts of the village, and several friends from the United States, had joined us for the ceremony. We filed across the red-brown river, called Samala’ Shikekel...

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xix-xx

I owe profound gratitude to many persons without whose support this book could not have become a reality. My first debt of gratitude is twofold:to Roberto Poz P

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-8

The highlands of Guatemala and of southern Mexico, a predominately indigenous region, are unique in terms of relationships between religion and indigenous populations. These communities, with legacies of traditional Maya 1 beliefs and practices for tens of thousands of years, have been the objects of many religious projects in the past five centuries: the long tyrannical shadow...

Part 1. THE FLORESCENCE OF MAYA SPIRITUALITY

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 9-10

read more

CHAPTER 1. A New Cycle of Light: The Public Emergence of Maya Spirituality

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 11-33

I was waiting outside the popular Do

read more

CHAPTER 2. Maya Cosmovision and Spirituality: Selecting, Examining, and Stretching Out Filaments of Light

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 34-54

One form of knowledge is investigation, as archeology, a science studied through texts. This analysis uses western techniques, not Maya. Then there is a life that lives with caites (sandals), carrying one’s own baggage,a people with another kind of knowledge. This second kind goes back thousands of years. It’s profound. That’s why we have remained here....

Part 2. A CULTURAL INHERITANCE

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 55-56

read more

CHAPTER 3. Ajq’ijab’: “To Enter the Mystery Is Our Reality”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 57-90

Calixta Gabriel Xiquín was twenty-seven years old when I asked if she would share her life story with me. That was October 1980. At twenty-six years of age, she fled alone from the highlands of Guatemala north to San Jose, California. Her three brothers had been assassinated within eighteen months of each other in 1978 –79, and her parent’s adobe home and cornfield had been...

Part 3. THE AESTHETICS OF SPACE, TIME, AND MOVEMENT

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 91-92

read more

CHAPTER 4. Sacred Geography: Reciprocity, Ritual Sites, and Quatrefoil Mapping

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 93-126

On April 31, 1997, my husband Martín and I were driving across the plain of Urbina, the mesa where the first great battle between Tecum Uman and Pedro de Alvarado occurred, trying to find our way to the home of the marimba maker who lived in the aldea of San Ramón. We often encountered cross-roads, and at each wondered, “Which way?” At one junction, we met a woman and a man, the man carrying large bundles...

read more

CHAPTER 5. The Calendar: Unbundling, Interpreting, and Appropriating the Chol Q’ij

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 127-153

...“It’s all about time,” begins Roberto Poz late one evening as we sit in his small,benighted office, saturated with deep, warm scents of copal and a single burning flame. “To comprehend and deepen in understanding the calendar takes time. The basis of our spirituality is the Chol Q’ij, our calendar of twenty day names paired with thirteen number names, equaling a count of 260 days. The...

read more

CHAPTER 6. Ceremony: The Fire Speaks

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 154-168

One afternoon I follow Catarina through the earthen patio into the large dark adobe room of her parents’ home in Zunil. A wooden bed in one corner, an altar in the opposite, and a weaving loom set centered against the back wall.“Here, for you, Doña Juana,” Catarina says as she pulls a low three-legged “Right here,” she answers, tucking strands of her dark hair under the woven cinta...

Part 4. THINKING, CONTEMPLATING, AND ACTING INTO THE FUTURE

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 169-170

read more

CHAPTER 7. The Ancient Things Received from Our Parents Are Not Lost

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 171-176

Many minds are engaged in building our future, thinking about it, and recreating it. The idea is to use the powerful symbols of the past to reconstruct the present and build the future, as we retrace the footprints of our ancestors on the ancient bridge that links the past to the present. From those building blocks we want to create the Mayan culture of the...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 177-182

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 183-192

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 193-201