In this Book

The Ohio State University Press
buy this book Buy This Book in Print
summary
In this edited collection commemorating the bicentennial of Hawthorne’s birth in 1804, Millicent Bell gathers essays by distinguished scholars and critics that examine the ways in which Hawthorne related himself to the “real” in his own world and expressed that relation in his writing. Radically revising the older view that he was detached from conditions of actual life in 19th-century American society, the authors undertake to show how current social conditions, current events, and political movements taking place at a crucial point in American history were an evident part of Hawthorne’s consciousness. The essays situate his imaginative writings in a contemporary context of common experience and rediscover a Hawthorne alert to pressing problems of his day, especially slavery, feminism, and reform in general—the very issues that motivated his contemporaries on the eve of the Civil War. Hawthorne was, with his own complicity, long described as a writer of unreal romances (as he preferred to call his novels) or “allegories of the heart” as he termed some of his short stories. But the literary mode of his fiction has long needed to be redefined. The essays in this collection contribute to the turn in recent Hawthorne criticism which shows how deeply implicated in realism his writing was. This volume should long continue to provide new starting points for changing views of a great writer. Contributors: Millicent Bell, Nina Baym, Michael T. Gilmore, Leland S. Person, David Leverenz, Larry J. Reynolds, Lawrence Buell, Rita K. Gollin, John Carlos Row, Brenda Wineapple

Table of Contents

  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Preface
  2. pp. vii-x
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 1. Hawthorne and the Real
  2. MILLICENT BELL
  3. pp. 1-21
  4. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 2. Hawthorne and Politics (Again): Words and Deeds in the 1850s
  2. MICHAEL T. GILMORE
  3. pp. 22-39
  4. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 3. “Strangely Ajar with the Human Race”: Hawthorne, Slavery, and the Questionof Moral Responsibility
  2. LARRY J. REYNOLDS
  3. pp. 40-69
  4. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 4. Hawthorne and the Problem of “American” Fiction: The Example of The Scarlet Letter
  2. LAWRENCE BUELL
  3. pp. 70-87
  4. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 5. Nathaniel Hawthorne and Transnationality
  2. JOHN CARLOS ROWE
  3. pp. 88-106
  4. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 6. Revisiting Hawthorne’s Feminism
  2. NINA BAYM
  3. pp. 107-124
  4. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 7. Hawthorne’s Early Tales: Male Authorship, DomesticViolence, and Female Readers
  2. LELAND S. PERSON
  3. pp. 125-143
  4. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 8. Working Women and Creative Doubles: Getting to The Marble Faun
  2. DAVID LEVERENZ
  3. pp. 144-158
  4. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 9. Estranged Allegiances in Hawthorne’s Unfinished Romances
  2. RITA K. GOLLIN
  3. pp. 159-180
  4. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 10. Nathaniel Hawthorne, Writer; or, The Fleeing of the Biographied
  2. BRENDA WINEAPPLE
  3. pp. 181-198
  4. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Works Cited
  2. pp. 199-214
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Index
  2. pp. 215-228
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents

Additional Information

ISBN
9780814272824
Related ISBN
9780814209868
MARC Record
OCLC
607605191
Pages
228
Launched on MUSE
2015-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.