In this Book

buy this book Buy This Book in Print
summary
In recent decades, literary studies have shown great interest in issues concerning the elements of narrative. Narratology, with its most vocal exponents in the writings of Bal, Genette, and Ricoeur, has also emerged as an increasingly important aspect of classical scholarship. However, studies have tended to focus on genres that are deemed straightforwardly narrative in form, such as epic, history, and the novel. This volume of heretofore unpublished essays explores how theories of narrative can promote further understandings and innovative readings of a genre that is not traditionally seen as narrative: Roman elegy. While elegy does not tell a continuous story, it does contain many embedded tales—narratives in their own right—located within and interacting with the primarily nonnarrative structure of the external frame-text. Latin Elegy and Narratology is the first volume entirely dedicated to the analysis of Latin elegy through the prism of theories of narrative. It brings together an international range of classicists whose specialties include Roman elegy, Augustan literature more generally, and critical theory. Among the questions explored in this volume are: Can the inset narratives of elegy, with their distinctive narrative strategies, provide the key to a poetics of elegiac story telling? In what ways does elegy renegotiate the linearity and teleology of narrative? Can formal theories of narratology help to make sense of the temporal contradictions and narrative incongruities that so often characterize elegiac stories? What can the reception of Roman elegy tell us about narratives of unity, identity, and authority? The essays contained in this volume provide provocative new readings and an enhanced understanding of Roman elegy using the tools of narratology.

Table of Contents

Download PDF Download Full Book
  1. Cover
  2. open access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
  2. open access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Table of Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-x
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Introduction: Narrating in Couplets
  2. Genevieve Liveley, Patricia Salzman-Mitchell
  3. pp. 1-14
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Part 1. Unveiling the Body of Elegiac Narrative: Two Narratological Approaches to Ovid's Amores 1.5
  2. pp. 15-18
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. 1. Elegy and the Erotics of Narratology
  2. Duncan Kennedy
  3. pp. 19-33
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. 2. Snapshots of a Love Affair: Amores 1.5 and the Program of Elegiac Narrative
  2. Patricia Salzman-Mitchell
  3. pp. 34-48
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Part 2. Telling Times: Elegy and Temporality
  1. 3. Chronological Segmentation in Ovid's Tristia: The Implicit Narrative of Elegy
  2. Eleonora Tola
  3. pp. 51-67
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. 4. Women's Time in the Remedia Amoris
  2. Hunter H. Gardner
  3. pp. 68-85
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. 5. Parquel Lines: Time and Narrative in Ovid's Heroides
  2. Genevieve Liveley
  3. pp. 86-102
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Part 3. Plots across Poems: Elegy and Story
  1. 6. Self-Reflections on Elegy Writing, in Two Parts: The Metapoetics of Diptych Elegies in Ovid, Amores 1.11 12
  2. Sophia Papaioannou
  3. pp. 105-122
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. 7. Narration in a Standstill: Propertius 1.16-18
  2. Christine Walde
  3. pp. 123-141
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. 8. Platonic Strategies in Ovid's Tales of Love
  2. Vered Lev Kenaan
  3. pp. 142-162
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Part 4. Seeing and Speaking the Self: Elegy and Subjectivity
  1. 9. Cornelia's Exemplum: Form and Idelology in Propertius 4.11
  2. Michèle Lowrie
  3. pp. 165-179
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. 10. The Expert, the Novice, and the Exile: A Narrative Tale of Three Ovids in Fasti
  2. Steven Green
  3. pp. 180-195
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. 11. The Potentials of Narrative: The Rhetoric of the Subjective in Tibullus
  2. Benjamin Todd Lee
  3. pp. 196-220
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Part 5. Narrative at the Receiving End: Elegy and Reception
  1. 12. Narrating Disiecta Corpora: The Rhetoric of Bodily Dismemberment in Prudentius Peristephanon 11
  2. Christian A. Kaesser
  3. pp. 223-240
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. 13. Telling Sulpicia's Joys: Narrativity at the Receiving End
  2. Mathilde Skoie
  3. pp. 241-256
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 257-273
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 274-276
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Index Locorum
  2. pp. 277-278
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. General Index
  2. pp. 279-286
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
Back To Top