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Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs)—including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, asthma and other chronic respiratory conditions, and cancers—are the leading causes of death worldwide. An estimated 36 million people die from such diseases each year; this represents roughly two out of three deaths globally. Eighty percent of these fatalities occur in developing countries. The statistics are staggering, yet millions of these deaths are preventable. This is an urgent global health issue that demands analysis of gaps in NCD research, new policies and practices, and actionable recommendations to close the gaps. The Johns Hopkins Institute for Applied Economics, Global Health, and the Study of Business Enterprise convened an NCD Working Group of leading scholars to examine a wide range of issues that both the private and public sectors must address to make sustainable progress in NCD prevention and treatment in lower- and middle-income countries. Collected in this volume are essays on five key areas where strengthened policies and health systems can have the most impact in the near future. • Accelerating regulatory harmonization • Structuring supply chains • Improving access to interventions • Restructuring primary care • Promoting multisectoral and intersectoral action While there is a growing literature on the problem of NCDs, none of the available studies provides background on the range of challenges matched with specific steps that can be taken by the public sector, private sector, and civil society working together. Noncommunicable Diseases in the Developing World presents a framework for understanding the salience of specific policy recommendations and detailed steps that can be taken now to move forward in the global campaign against NCDs. This book will be of interest to practitioners, scholars, and students in public health as well as those framing and implementing health policies in the private and public sectors.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright Page
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  1. Contents
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  1. List of Contributors
  2. pp. vii-xii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xiii-xiv
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  1. Introduction. Noncommunicable Diseases in the Developing World: Closing the Gap
  2. Jeffrey L. Sturchio, Louis Galambos
  3. pp. 1-27
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  1. 1. Regulation of NCD Medicines in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Current Challenges and Future Prospects
  2. pp. 28-52
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  1. 2. Improving Access to Medicines for Noncommunicable Diseases through Better Supply Chains
  2. Lisa Smith, Prashant Yadav
  3. pp. 53-81
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  1. 3. Learning from the HIV/AIDS Experience to Improve NCD Interventions
  2. Soeren Mattke
  3. pp. 82-98
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  1. 4. Reconfiguring Primary Care for the Era of Chronic and Noncommunicable Diseases
  2. Margaret E. Kruk, Gustavo Nigenda, Felicia Marie Knaul
  3. pp. 99-132
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  1. 5. Sectoral Cooperation for the Prevention and Control of NCDs
  2. George Alleyne, Sania Nishtar
  3. pp. 133-151
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  1. Conclusion. The Developing World and the Challenge of Noncommunicable Diseases
  2. Stuart Gilmour, Kenji Shibuya
  3. pp. 152-162
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 163-170
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781421412931
Related ISBN
9781421412924
MARC Record
OCLC
864713238
Pages
184
Launched on MUSE
2014-03-10
Language
English
Open Access
No
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