In this Book

summary
We live in a time of monsters. Monsters provide a key to understanding the culture that spawned them. So argue the essays in this wide-ranging and fascinating collection that asks the question, What happens when critical theorists take the study of monsters seriously as a means of examining our culture?
 
In viewing the monstrous body as a metaphor for the cultural body, the contributors to Monster Theory consider beasts, demons, freaks, and fiends as symbolic expressions of cultural unease that pervade a society and shape its collective behavior. Through a historical sampling of monsters, these essays argue that our fascination for the monstrous testifies to our continued desire to explore difference and prohibition.

Contributors: Mary Baine Campbell, Brandeis U; David L. Clark, McMaster U; Frank Grady, U of Missouri, St. Louis; David A. Hedrich Hirsch, U of Illinois; Lawrence D. Kritzman, Dartmouth College; Kathleen Perry Long, Cornell U; Stephen Pender; Allison Pingree, Harvard U; Anne Lake Prescott, Barnard College; John O'Neill, York U; William Sayers, George Washington U; Michael Uebel, U of Virginia; Ruth Waterhouse.


Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. p. v
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Preface: In a Time of Monsters
  2. p. vii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. I. Monster Theory
  2. pp. 1-2
  1. 1. Monster Culture (Seven Theses)
  2. Jeffrey Jerome Cohen
  3. pp. 3-25
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 2. Beowulf as Palimpsest
  2. Ruth Waterhouse
  3. pp. 26-39
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 3. Monstrosity, Illegibility, Denegation: De Man, bp Nichol, and the Resistance to Postmodernism
  2. David L Clark
  3. pp. 40-72
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. II. Monstrous Identity
  2. pp. 73-74
  1. 4. The Odd Couple: Gargantua and Tom Thumb
  2. Anne Lake Prescott
  3. pp. 75-91
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 5. America's "United Siamese Brothers": Chang and Eng and Nineteenth-Century Ideologies of Democracy and Domesticity
  2. Allison Pingree
  3. pp. 92-114
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 6. Liberty, Equality, Monstrosity: Revolutionizing the Family in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein
  2. David A. Hedrich Hirsch
  3. pp. 115-140
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. III. Monstrous Inquiry
  2. pp. 141-142
  1. 7. "No Monsters at the Resurrection": Inside Some Conjoined Twins
  2. Stephen Fender
  3. pp. 143-167
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 8. Representing the Monster: Cognition, Cripples, and Other Limp Parts in Montaigne's "Des Boyteux"
  2. Lawrence D. Kritzman
  3. pp. 168-182
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 9. Hermaphrodites Newly Discovered: The Cultural Monsters of Sixteenth-Century France
  2. Kathleen Perry Long
  3. pp. 183-201
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 10. Anthropometamorphosis: John Bulwer's Monsters of Cosmetology and the Science of Culture
  2. Mary Baine Campbell
  3. pp. 202-222
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. IV. Monstrous History
  2. pp. 223-224
  1. 11. Vampire Culture
  2. Frank Grady
  3. pp. 225-241
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 12. The Alien and Alienated as Unquiet Dead in the Sagas of the Icelanders
  2. William Sayers
  3. pp. 242-263
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. 13. Unthinking the Monster: Twelfth-Century Responses to Saracen Alterity
  2. pp. 264-291
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 14. Dinosaurs-R-Us: The (Un)Natural History of Jurassic Park
  2. John O'Neill
  3. pp. 292-308
  4. restricted access Download |
  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 309-312
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 313-315
  3. restricted access Download |

Additional Information

ISBN
9780816687640
Related ISBN
9780816628551
MARC Record
OCLC
614485179
Pages
336
Launched on MUSE
2015-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.