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“Pagan life seduces me a little more with each passing day. If it were possible today, I would change my religion and would joyfully embrace poetic paganism,” wrote the Armenian poet Daniel Varuzhan in 1908. During the seven years that remained in his life, he wrote largely in this “pagan” vein. If it was an artistic endeavour, why then should art be defined in reference to religion? And which religion precisely? Was Varuzhan echoing Schelling’s Philosophy of Art? Mourning Philology draws on Varuzhan and his work to present a history of the national imagination, which is also a history of national philology, as a reaction to the two main philological inventions of the nineteenth century: mythological religion and the native. In its first part, the book thus gives an account of the successive stages of the orientalist philology. The last episode in this story of national emergence took place in 1914 in Constantinople, when the literary journal Mehyan gathered around Varuzhan the great names to come of Armenian literature in the diaspora

Table of Contents

  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. 1-4
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. A Note on the Transliteration
  2. pp. vii-8
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-12
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  1. Introduction. Art, Religion, and Philology
  2. pp. 1-12
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  1. Part One. “The Seal of Silence”
  2. pp. 13-26
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  1. Chapter 1. Variants and Facets of the Literary Erection
  2. pp. 15-35
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  1. Chapter 2. Abovean and the Birth of the Native
  2. pp. 36-65
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  1. Chapter 3. Orientalism and Neo-Archeology
  2. pp. 66-105
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  1. Part Two. Daniel Varuzhan: The End of Religion
  2. pp. 107-120
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  1. Chapter 4. The Disaster of the Native
  2. pp. 109-132
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  1. Chapter 5. The Other Scene of Representation
  2. pp. 133-148
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  1. Chapter 6. Erection and Self-Sacrifice
  2. pp. 149-170
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  1. Chapter 7. The Mourning of Religion I
  2. pp. 171-195
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  1. Chapter 8. The Mourning of Religion II
  2. pp. 196-217
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  1. Epilogue. Nietzsche in Armenian Literature at the Turn of the Twentieth Century
  2. pp. 219-237
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  1. Appendices. Translations
  2. pp. 239-252
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  1. Appendix A. Excerpts from Nineteenth-Century Works of Philology and Ethnography
  2. pp. 241-264
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  1. Appendix B. Essays in Mehyan and Other Writings of Constant Zarian
  2. pp. 265-299
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  1. Appendix C. Daniel Varuzhan: Poems and Prose
  2. pp. 301-327
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 329-386
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 387-400
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 401-406
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Additional Information

ISBN
9780823255269
Related ISBN
9780823255245
MARC Record
OCLC
868223137
Pages
384
Launched on MUSE
2014-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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