In this Book

buy this book Buy This Book in Print
summary
Modern environmentalism has come to realize that many of its key concerns—“wilderness” and “nature” among them—are contested territory, viewed differently by different people. Understanding nature requires science and ecology, to be sure, but it also requires a sensitivity to history, culture, and narrative. Thus, understanding nature is a fundamentally hermeneutic task.

Table of Contents

restricted access Download Full Book
  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. 1-6
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xi-xiv
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Introduction: Environmental Hermeneutics
  2. pp. 1-14
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. I. Interpretation and the Task of Thinking Environmentally
  1. 1. Environmental Hermeneutics Deep in the Forest
  2. pp. 17-35
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. 2. Morrow’s Ants: E. O. Wilson and Gadamer’s Critique of (Natural) Historicism
  2. pp. 36-64
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. 3. Layering: Body, Building, Biography
  2. pp. 65-81
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. 4. Might Nature Be Interpreted as a“Saturated Phenomenon”?
  2. pp. 82-101
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. 5. Must Environmental Philosophy Relinquish the Concept of Nature? A Hermeneutic Reply to Steven Vogel
  2. pp. 102-120
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. II. Situating the Self
  1. 6. Environmental Hermeneutics and Environmental/Eco-Psychology: Explorations in Environmental Identity
  2. pp. 123-140
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. 7. Environmental Hermeneutics with and for Others: Ricoeur’s Ethics and the Ecological Self
  2. pp. 141-159
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. 8. Bodily Moods and Unhomely Environments: The Hermeneutics of Agoraphobia and the Spirit of Place
  2. pp. 160-178
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. III. Narrativity and Image
  1. 9. Narrative and Nature:Appreciating and Understanding the Nonhuman World
  2. pp. 181-200
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. 10. The Question Concerning Nature
  2. pp. 201-224
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. 11. New Nature Narratives:Landscape Hermeneutics and Environmental Ethics
  2. pp. 225-242
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. IV. Environments, Place, and the Experience of Time
  1. 12. Memory, Imagination, and the Hermeneutics of Place
  2. pp. 245-263
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. 13. The Betweenness of Monuments
  2. pp. 264-280
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. 14. My Place in the Sun
  2. pp. 281-296
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. 15. How Hermeneutics Might Save the Life of (Environmental) Ethics
  2. pp. 297-312
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Notes
  2. pp. 313-364
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. A Bibliographic Overview of Research in Environmental Hermeneutics
  2. pp. 365-372
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 373-376
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Index
  2. pp. 377-384
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Further Reading
  2. pp. 399-400
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.