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The idea that sugar, plantations, slavery, and capitalism were all present at the birth of the Atlantic world has long dominated scholarly thinking. In nine original essays by a multinational group of top scholars, ###Tropical Babylons# re-evaluates this so-called "sugar revolution." The most comprehensive comparative study to date of early Atlantic sugar economies, this collection presents a revisionist examination of the origins of society and economy in the Atlantic world. Focusing on areas colonized by Spain and Portugal (before the emergence of the Caribbean sugar colonies of England, France, and Holland), these essays show that despite reliance on common knowledge and technology, there were considerable variations in the way sugar was produced. With studies of Iberia, Madeira and the Canary Islands, Hispaniola, Cuba, Brazil, and Barbados, this volume demonstrates the similarities and differences between the plantation colonies, questions the very idea of a sugar revolution, and shows how the specific conditions in each colony influenced the way sugar was produced and the impact of that crop on the formation of "tropical Babylons"--multiracial societies of great oppression. Contributors: Alejandro de la Fuente, University of Pittsburgh Herbert Klein, Columbia University John J. McCusker, Trinity University Russell R. Menard, University of Minnesota William D. Phillips Jr., University of Minnesota Genaro Rodríguez Morel, Seville, Spain Stuart B. Schwartz, Yale University Eddy Stols, Leuven University, Belgium Alberto Vieira, Centro de Estudos Atlanticos, Madeira This collection of nine original essays provides the most comprehensive comparative study to date of early Atlantic sugar economies as well as a revisionist examination of the origins of society and economy in the Atlantic world. Focusing on areas colonized by Spain and Portugal (before the emergence of the Caribbean sugar colonies of England, France, & Holland), these essays show that despite common knowledge and technology, there were considerable variations in the way sugar was produced, which leads Schwartz to question the longheld notion of a Caribbean "sugar revolution." He also examines the role of plantation colonies in the formation of "tropical Babylons"--multiracial, oppressive societies. This collection of original essays provides a comparative study of early Caribbean sugar economies as well as a revisionist examination of the origins of society and economy in the Atlantic world. Schwartz also examines the role of plantation colonies in the formation of multiracial, oppressive societies. The idea that sugar, plantations, slavery, and capitalism were all present at the birth of the Atlantic world has long dominated scholarly thinking. In nine original essays by a multinational group of top scholars, ###Tropical Babylons# re-evaluates this so-called "sugar revolution." The most comprehensive comparative study to date of early Atlantic sugar economies, this collection presents a revisionist examination of the origins of society and economy in the Atlantic world. Focusing on areas colonized by Spain and Portugal (before the emergence of the Caribbean sugar colonies of England, France, and Holland), these essays show that despite reliance on common knowledge and technology, there were considerable variations in the way sugar was produced. With studies of Iberia, Madeira and the Canary Islands, Hispaniola, Cuba, Brazil, and Barbados, this volume demonstrates the similarities and differences between the plantation colonies, questions the very idea of a sugar revolution, and shows how the specific conditions in each colony influenced the way sugar was produced and the impact of that crop on the formation of "tropical Babylons"--multiracial societies of great oppression. Contributors: Alejandro de la Fuente, University of Pittsburgh Herbert Klein, Columbia University John J. McCusker, Trinity University Russell R. Menard, University of Minnesota William D. Phillips Jr., University of Minnesota Genaro Rodríguez Morel, Seville, Spain Stuart B. Schwartz, Yale University Eddy Stols, Leuven University, Belgium Alberto Vieira, Centro de Estudos Atlanticos, Madeira

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. p. 1
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. 2-7
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-x
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xi-xiii
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  1. Note on Weights and Currencies
  2. pp. xiii-17
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  1. 1 Introduction
  2. pp. 1-26
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  1. 2 Sugar in Iberia
  2. pp. 27-41
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  1. 3 Sugar Islands: The Sugar Economy of Madeira and the Canaries, 1450–1650
  2. pp. 42-84
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  1. 4 The Sugar Economy of Española in the Sixteenth Century
  2. pp. 85-114
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  1. 5 Sugar and Slavery in Early Colonial Cuba
  2. pp. 115-157
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  1. 6 A Commonwealth within Itself: The Early Brazilian Sugar Industry, 1550–1670
  2. pp. 158-200
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  1. 7 The Atlantic Slave Trade to 1650
  2. pp. 201-236
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  1. 8 The Expansion of the Sugar Market in Western Europe
  2. pp. 237-288
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  1. 9 The Sugar Industry in the Seventeenth Century: A New Perspective on the Barbadian ‘‘Sugar Revolution’’
  2. pp. 289-330
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 331-332
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 333-347
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781469603667
Related ISBN
9780807828755
MARC Record
OCLC
652280205
Pages
368
Launched on MUSE
2014-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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