In this Book

buy this book Buy This Book in Print
summary
Since the 1950s, anthropologist Sidney W. Mintz has been at the forefront of efforts to integrate the disciplines of anthropology and history. Author of ###Sweetness and Power: The Place of Sugar in Modern History# and other groundbreaking works, he was one of the first scholars to anticipate and critique "globalization studies." However, a strong tradition of epistemologically sophisticated and theoretically informed empiricism of the sort advanced by Mintz has yet to become a cornerstone of contemporary anthropological scholarship. This collection of essays by leading anthropologists and historians serves as an intervention that rests on Mintz's rigorously historicist ethnographic work, which has long predicted the methodological crisis in anthropology today. Contributors to this volume build on Mintzean interdisciplinarity to provide productive ways to theorize the everyday life of local groups and communities, nation-states, and regions and the interconnections among them. Consisting of theoretical and case studies of Latin America, North America, the Caribbean, and Papua New Guinea, ###Empirical Futures# demonstrates how Mintzean perspectives advance our understanding of the relationship among empirical approaches, the uses of ethnographic and historical data and theory-building, and the study of these from both local and global vantage points. Contributors: George Baca, Goucher College Frederick Cooper, New York University Virginia R. Dominguez, University of Illinois Frederick Errington, Trinity College Deborah Gewertz, Amherst College Juan Giusti-Cordero, University of Puerto Rico at Rio Piedras Aisha Khan, New York University Samuel Martínez, University of Connecticut Stephan Palmié, University of Chicago Jane Schneider, City University of New York Graduate Center Rebecca J. Scott, University of Michigan Since the 1950s, when he was one of the first scholars to anticipate "globalization studies," anthropologist Sidney W. Mintz, author of Sweetness and Power: The Place of Sugar in Modern History and other groundbreaking works, has been at the forefront of efforts to integrate the disciplines of anthropology and history. This collection of essays commissioned by three anthropologists demonstrates that a strong tradition of epistemologically sophisticated and theoretically informed empiricism of the sort advanced by Mintz has yet to become a cornerstone of contemporary anthropological scholarship. As George Baca, Aisha Khan, and Stephan Palmié argue in their introduction, the volume is offered as an intervention that rests on Mintz's rigorously historicist ethnographic work, which has long predicted the methodological crisis in anthropology today--what is the place of ethnography in the heavily theory-laden environment of anthropology today? These new essays, written by a roster of leading senior scholars*, focus on the Caribbean and greater Atlantic world, the area of much of Mintz's interest and influence. Some essays deal with topics of recent interest, such as globalization and hybridity, ideas anticipated by Mintz years ago; other essays point to matters such as gender and race that are largely missing from Mintz's work. All of the essays, whether theoretical or case studies, demonstrate how a Mintzean approach advances the study of culture, power, and identity. *Frederick Cooper, Juan Giusti-Cordero, Rebecca J. Scott, Jane Schneider, Virginia R. Dominguez, Deborah Gewertz, Frederick Errington, and Samuel Martínez Contributors to this volume address a current methodological crisis in anthropology today by turning to the methods promoted by Sidney W. Mintz, who has been at the forefront of efforts to integrate the disciplines of anthropology and history for several decades and was one of the first scholars to anticipate and critique "globalization studies." Essays by leading anthropologists and historians collected here present case studies of Latin America, North America, the Caribbean, and Papua New Guinea that demonstrate the productive use of Mintz's approach. Contributors to this volume address a current methodological crisis in anthropology today by turning to the methods promoted by Sidney W. Mintz, who has been at the forefront of efforts to integrate the disciplines of anthropology and history for several decades and was one of the first scholars to anticipate and critique "globalization studies." Essays by leading anthropologists and historians collected here present case studies of Latin America, North America, the Caribbean, and Papua New Guinea that demonstrate the productive use of Mintz's approach. Since the 1950s, anthropologist Sidney W. Mintz has been at the forefront of efforts to integrate the disciplines of anthropology and history. Author of ###Sweetness and Power: The Place of Sugar in Modern History# and other groundbreaking works, he was one of the first scholars to anticipate and critique "globalization studies." However, a strong tradition of epistemologically sophisticated and theoretically informed empiricism of the sort advanced by Mintz has yet to become a cornerstone of contemporary anthropological scholarship. This collection of essays by leading anthropologists and historians serves as an intervention that rests on Mintz's rigorously historicist ethnographic work, which has long predicted the methodological crisis in anthropology today. Contributors to this volume build on Mintzean interdisciplinarity to provide productive ways to theorize the everyday life of local groups and communities, nation-states, and regions and the interconnections among them. Consisting of theoretical and case studies of Latin America, North America, the Caribbean, and Papua New Guinea, ###Empirical Futures# demonstrates how Mintzean perspectives advance our understanding of the relationship among empirical approaches, the uses of ethnographic and historical data and theory-building, and the study of these from both local and global vantage points. Contributors: George Baca, Goucher College Frederick Cooper, New York University Virginia R. Dominguez, University of Illinois Frederick Errington, Trinity College Deborah Gewertz, Amherst College Juan Giusti-Cordero, University of Puerto Rico at Rio Piedras Aisha Khan, New York University Samuel Martínez, University of Connecticut Stephan Palmié, University of Chicago Jane Schneider, City University of New York Graduate Center Rebecca J. Scott, University of Michigan

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. 1-1
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. 2-5
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. pp. 6-7
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. vii-viii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-30
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Space, Time, and History: The Conceptual Limits of Globalization
  2. pp. 31-57
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Beyond Sugar Revolutions: Rethinking the Spanish Caribbean in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries
  2. pp. 58-83
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Microhistory Set in Motion: A Nineteenth-Century Atlantic Creole Itinerary
  2. pp. 84-111
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Abstinence and Power: The Place of Prohibition in American History
  2. pp. 112-144
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Evidence and Power, Sweet and Sour
  2. pp. 145-172
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Jealous Women in the Cane
  2. pp. 173-195
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Toward an Anthropology of Excess: Wanting More (while Getting Less) on a Caribbean Global Periphery
  2. pp. 196-226
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 227-228
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 229-232
  3. restricted access Download |

Additional Information

ISBN
9781469604558
Related ISBN
9780807833452
MARC Record
OCLC
642660995
Pages
240
Launched on MUSE
2014-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.