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The Ohio State University Press
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Art after Philosophy: Boris Pasternak’s Early Prose, by Elena Glazov-Corrigan, redefines an area in Slavic studies which has suffered from neglect for several decades, namely, Pasternak’s early prose narratives. In her bold new study, Glazov-Corrigan analyzes the conceptual networks of thought Pasternak developed when he turned to literature after abandoning the study of Neo-Kantianism in Marburg during the summer of 1912. This book shows conclusively that Pasternak’s knowledge of philosophy is inseparable from his prose works, even though in his early stories and novellas (1913–1918) philosophical ideas operate neither as discrete textual units nor as micro-elements or clusters of possible signification. In the early Pasternak, philosophy becomes a narrative art, a large-scale narrative frame, a manner of seeing rather than of constructing reality. After Roman Jakobson’s famous 1935 essay, which characterized the early Pasternak as a “virtuoso of metonymy,” in contrast to the metaphoric Mayakovsky, no other approach has been able to generate comparable scholarly influence. The present study takes up the implicit challenge of this critical impasse. Entering into a debate with Jakobson’s findings, Art after Philosophy illuminates Pasternak’s boldest artistic experiments and suggests to his readers entirely new ways of approaching not only his early but also his later writing.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. 1-1
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. 2-7
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-ix
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  1. Abbreviations
  2. pp. x-xi
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xii-xv
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-11
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  1. 1. The Character of Philosophical Influence in Pasternak's Early Prose
  2. pp. 12-37
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  1. 2. Similarity and Contiguity in Pasternak's Early Poetics and Their Philosophical Underpinnings
  2. pp. 38-70
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  1. 3. Arguing with the Sun in "The Mark of Apelles"
  2. pp. 71-112
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  1. 4. "Letters from Tula": "Was ist Apperzeption?"
  2. pp. 113-157
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  1. 5. Contextualizing the Intellectual Aims of 1918: From "Letters from Tula" to The Childhood of Luvers
  2. pp. 158-197
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  1. 6. "The Long Days" in The Childhood of Luvers: Chronology of a Permeable Self
  2. pp. 198-232
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  1. 7. "The Stranger" in The Childhood of Luvers: Disruptions in Chronology and the Collision with Other Worlds
  2. pp. 233-295
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  1. 8. Conclusion: Pasternak's Symbolic World: Prose and Philosophy
  2. pp. 296-326
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 327-341
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 342-344
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  1. General Index
  2. pp. 345-348
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  1. Back Cover
  2. pp. 366-366
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