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In Women and Rhetoric between the Wars, editors Ann George, M. Elizabeth Weiser, and Janet Zepernick have gathered together insightful essays from major scholars on women whose practices and theories helped shape the field of modern rhetoric. Examining the period between World War I and World War II, this volume sheds light on the forgotten rhetorical work done by the women of that time. It also goes beyond recovery to develop new methodologies for future research in the field.
Collected within are analyses of familiar figures such as Jane Addams, Amelia Earhart, Helen Keller, and Bessie Smith, as well as explorations of less well known, yet nevertheless influential, women such as Zitkala-Ša, Jovita González, and Florence Sabin. Contributors evaluate the forces in the civic, entertainment, and academic scenes that influenced the rhetorical praxis of these women. Each essay presents examples of women’s rhetoric that move us away from the “waves” model toward a more accurate understanding of women’s multiple, diverse rhetorical interventions in public discourse. The collection thus creates a new understanding of historiography, the rise of modern rhetorical theory, and the role of women professionals after suffrage. From celebrities to scientists, suffragettes to academics, the dynamic women of this volume speak eloquently to the field of rhetoric studies today.
 

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. 1-3
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  1. Title Page
  2. pp. 4-4
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  1. Copyright
  2. pp. 5-7
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. List of Figures
  2. pp. ix-11
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xi-xiii
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-16
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  1. Voluntary Associations for the Civic Scene
  2. pp. 17-93
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  1. 1. Continuous Mediation: Julia Grace Wales’s New Rhetoric
  2. pp. 19-31
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  1. 2. The Hope for Peace and Bread
  2. pp. 32-47
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  1. 3. Gertrude Bonnin’s Transrhetorical Fight for Land Rights
  2. pp. 48-62
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  1. 4. A Rhetor’s Apprenticeship: Reading Frances Perkins’s Rhetorical Autobiography
  2. pp. 63-78
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  1. 5. Working Together and Being Prepared: Early Girl Scouting as Citizenship Training
  2. pp. 79-93
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  1. Popular Celebrity in the Epideictic Scene
  2. pp. 95-190
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  1. 6. Reading Helen Keller
  2. pp. 97-113
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  1. 7. Dorothy Day: Personalizing (to) the Masses
  2. pp. 114-128
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  1. 8. The Shocking Morality of Nannie Helen Burroughs
  2. pp. 129-142
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  1. 9. Bessie Smith’s Blues as Rhetorical Advocacy
  2. pp. 143-158
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  1. 10. Traditional Form, Subversive Function: Aunt Molly Jackson’s Labor Struggles
  2. pp. 159-174
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  1. 11. Sweethearts of the Skies
  2. pp. 175-190
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  1. Academia and the Scene of Professionalism
  2. pp. 191-259
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  1. 12. Field Guides: Women Writing Anthropology
  2. pp. 193-208
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  1. 13. “Have We Not a Mind Like They?” : Jovita González on Nation and Gender
  2. pp. 209-222
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  1. 14. “Exceptional Women” : Epideictic Rhetoric and Women Scientists
  2. pp. 223-239
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  1. 15. “Long I Followed Happy Guides”: Activism, Advocacy, and English Studies
  2. pp. 240-259
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  1. Works Cited
  2. pp. 263-282
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 283-285
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 287-302
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  1. Studies in Rhetorics and Feminisms
  2. pp. 303-320
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  1. Other Books in the Studies in Rhetorics and Feminisms Series
  2. pp. 304-321
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  1. Back Cover
  2. pp. 322-322
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Additional Information

ISBN
9780809331390
Related ISBN
9780809331383
MARC Record
OCLC
833300195
Pages
320
Launched on MUSE
2013-05-20
Language
English
Open Access
No
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