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Over the last few decades the notion of civil religion has gained parlance as a way of making sense of American culture and religion. The term civil religion, often used simply to mean patriotism, refers in this text to the religious styles and rhetoric that emerge from the act of founding of the American Republic as a democratic nation. The author examines the work of three major American authors whose lives span 250 years and who, in spite of their different heritages, all expressed themselves through the tradition of the jeremiad, or prophetic judgment of a people for backsliding from their destiny. Jonathan Edwards, the eighteenth-century theologian whose work defined the Great Awakening, made use of the jeremiad through a theological discourse that defined conversion as a performative act. Stewart demonstrates how Herman Melville, the author of Moby Dick, questioned the ideology of American optimism; her focus here falls upon his lesser known and often overlooked novel, Pierre, or the Ambiguities. W. E. B. Du Bois, the preeminent African American intellectual and activist took up the jeremiad from the implications of the Reconstruction.

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Cover
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  1. Title Page
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  1. Copyright
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  1. Table of Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Foreword
  2. pp. ix-xii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xiii-xiv
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-27
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  1. Part One: The Beginning of the American Revolution in the Conversion of Northampton
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  1. 1: The Travail of the Puritan Covenant
  2. pp. 31-52
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  1. 2: Original Sin
  2. pp. 53-77
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  1. 3: God Is No Respecter of Persons
  2. pp. 78-95
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  1. 4: The “Strange Revolution”and the Aesthetics of Grace
  2. pp. 96-126
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  1. Part Two: The Second Great Awakening, the National Period, and Melville’s American Destiny
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  1. 5: Pierre; or, The Ambiguities and the Formation of the American Dilemma
  2. pp. 129-142
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  1. 6: A Revolutionary Marriage Deferred
  2. pp. 143-179
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  1. 7: Chapter Seven The Mystery of Melville’s Darkwoman
  2. pp. 180-210
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  1. Part Three: From “Self ” to “Soul”: W. E. B. Du Bois’s Critical Understanding of the Ideals of Liberal Democracy in the New World
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  1. 8: Strange Jeremiah Civil Religion and the Public Intellectual
  2. pp. 213-224
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  1. 9: Strivings and Original Sin
  2. pp. 225-242
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  1. 10: The Talented Tenth and Colonizing Heroes
  2. pp. 243-264
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  1. 11: Du Bois’s Aesthetic of Beauty in the New World
  2. pp. 265-286
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  1. Conclusion The Irony of the American Self
  2. pp. 287-297
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 299-347
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  1. Works Cited
  2. pp. 349-362
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 363-375
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