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A fascinating look at Chinese perceptions of the United States and the cultural and political background that informs them. What do the Chinese think of America? Why did Jiang Zemin praise the film Titanic? Why did Mao call FDR’s envoy Patrick Hurley “a clown?” Why did the book China Can Say No (meaning “no” to the United States) become a bestseller only a few years after a replica of the Statue of Liberty was erected during protests in Tianamen Square? Jing Li’s fascinating book explores Chinese perceptions of the United States during the twentieth century. As Li notes, these two very different countries both played significant roles in world affairs and there were important interactions between them. Chinese view of the United States were thus influenced by various and changing considerations, resulting in interpretations and opinions that were complex and sometimes contradictory. Li uncovers the historical, political, and cultural forces that have influenced these alternately positive and negative opinions. Revealing in its insight into the twentieth century, China’s America is also instructive for all who care about the understandings between these two powerful countries as we move into the twenty-first century.

Table of Contents

  1. Front Cover
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  1. Copyright page
  2. p. iv
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  1. Contents
  2. p. v
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  1. Illustrations
  2. p. vii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Note on Romanization
  2. p. xi
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  1. Illustration Credits
  2. p. xiii
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-9
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  1. 1: Statesmen, Scholars, and the Men in the Street, 1900 –1949
  2. pp. 11-50
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  1. 2: “Farewell, Leighton Stuart!”: Anti-Americanism in the Early 1950s
  2. pp. 51-69
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  1. 3: Challenging a Taboo: China’s Liberal Critics and America in 1957
  2. pp. 71-90
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  1. 4: Communist Crusade and Capitalist Stronghold: Mao’s Everlasting Revolution and the United States, 1957–1979
  2. pp. 91-120
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  1. 5: A Balancing Act: The People’s Daily, 1979–1989
  2. pp. 121-144
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  1. 6: Chinese Review America: The Dushu Magazine, 1979–1989
  2. pp. 145-167
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  1. 7: Popular and Not-So-Popular America: The Chinese Masses and the U.S.A. in the 1980s
  2. pp. 169-190
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  1. 8: Shall the Twain Ever Meet?: Old Themes and New Trends in the Last Decade of the Century
  2. pp. 191-225
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  1. Conclusion
  2. pp. 227-231
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  1. Historiographical Note
  2. pp. 233-236
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 237-274
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 275-290
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 291-302
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781438435183
Related ISBN
9781438435176
MARC Record
OCLC
713036876
Pages
316
Launched on MUSE
2012-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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