In this Book

summary

Between 1866 and 1969, an estimated 8,000 individuals—at least 90 percent of whom were Native Hawaiians—were sent to Molokai’s remote Kalaupapa peninsula because they were believed to have leprosy. Unwilling to accept the loss of their families, homes, and citizenship, these individuals ensured they would be accorded their rightful place in history. They left a powerful testimony of their lives in the form of letters, petitions, music, memoirs, and oral history interviews. Kalaupapa combines more than 200 hours of interviews with archival documents, including over 300 letters and petitions written by the earliest residents translated from Hawaiian.

It has long been assumed that those sent to Kalaupapa were unconcerned with the world they were forced to leave behind. The present work shows that residents remained actively interested and involved in life beyond Kalaupapa. They petitioned the Hawaii Legislative Assembly in 1874, seeking justice. They fervently supported Queen Liliuokalani and the Hawaiian Kingdom prior to annexation and contributed to the relief effort in Europe following World War I. In 1997 Kalaupapa residents advocated at the United Nations together with people affected by leprosy from around the world.

This book presents at long last the story of Kalaupapa as told by its people.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vi-viii
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  1. Foreword
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. xi-xxi
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  1. Part I. What Shall Be Done? (1866–1883)
  2. pp. 1-2
  1. Chapter 1. Perhaps They Are Just Left There: The First Twelve People Arrive at Kalawao
  2. pp. 3-14
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  1. Chapter 2. The Thoughts of the Hawaiian Family Have Been Aroused: Two Cultural Responses to Leprosy
  2. pp. 15-26
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  1. Chapter 3. Not of the Hawaiian Culture: The Onset of Starvation and Political Activism
  2. pp. 27-40
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  1. Chapter 4. Siloam’s Healing Pool: Early Leadership at Kalawao
  2. pp. 41-52
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  1. Chapter 5. Misfortune and Great Sorrow Has Beset Me: William Humphreys Uwelealea
  2. pp. 53-62
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  1. Chapter 6. With Heaviness of Mind: Jonathan Hawaii Napela
  2. pp. 63-72
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  1. Chapter 7. His Dying Words Were “A Little Poi”: Peter Young Kaeo
  2. pp. 73-86
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  1. Chapter 8. You Could Not Wish for Better People: The Arrival of Father Damien
  2. pp. 87-100
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  1. Chapter 9. Steaming Hot Coffee: Ambrose Kanewalii Hutchison
  2. pp. 101-114
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  1. Chapter 10. Damien with the Sparkling Eyes: Music, Kindness, Celebration
  2. pp. 115-126
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  1. Chapter 11. A Different Circle: Mother Marianne Cope and the Sisters of St. Francis
  2. pp. 127-137
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  1. Part II. What Is Proper and Just? (1884–1901)
  2. pp. 139-140
  1. Chapter 12. “Kaumaha Nohoi” (Deep Sorrow): Queen Kapiolani Visits Kalaupapa
  2. pp. 141-152
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  1. Chapter 13. Indignity Keenly Felt by All: Experience in the Lahaina Prison
  2. pp. 153-160
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  1. Chapter 14. I Am Not Guilty: Keanu and Dr. Arning
  2. pp. 161-168
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  1. Chapter 15. “We Will Take Care of Him”: Father Damien Is Diagnosed with Leprosy
  2. pp. 169-178
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  1. Chapter 16. Ways That Are a Little Exceptional: Joseph Dutton and Father Conrardy
  2. pp. 179-188
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  1. Chapter 17. Seriously Consider What Is Proper and Just: Effects of the Bayonet Constitution
  2. pp. 189-198
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  1. Chapter 18. Kapoli Brought Flowers: Kapoli Kamakau
  2. pp. 199-212
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  1. Chapter 19. Nunc Dimittis: The Death of Father Damien
  2. pp. 213-224
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  1. Chapter 20. Unforgotten in Our Hearts: Kaluaikoolau, Piilani, and Kaleimanu
  2. pp. 225-236
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  1. Chapter 21. We, Your Nation of People, Will Survive: Queen Liliuokalani and the Hawaiian Kingdom
  2. pp. 237-250
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  1. Chapter 22. The Soul of This Land: Robert Kaaoao and Thomas Nakanaela
  2. pp. 251-264
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  1. Chapter 23. It Is in Your Power to Make All Things Right: The Quest for Self-Government
  2. pp. 265-277
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  1. Part III. From Generation to Generation (1902–1929)
  2. pp. 279-280
  1. Chapter 24. Entitled to Every Consideration: Mr. McVeigh and Dr. Goodhue
  2. pp. 281-296
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  1. Chapter 25. The Fourth of July, 1907: Jack and Charmian London Visit Kalaupapa
  2. pp. 297-312
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  1. Chapter 26. No Place to Honor This Man: Elemakule Pa and the Federal Hospital
  2. pp. 313-328
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  1. Chapter 27. We Called It Ohana: The Bishop Home
  2. pp. 329-338
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  1. Chapter 28. “O Makalapua”: The Death of Mother Marianne
  2. pp. 339-346
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  1. Chapter 29. From Generation to Generation: David Kupele and Ben Pea
  2. pp. 347-362
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  1. Chapter 30. Chaulmoogra Oil—Hawaii’s Message of Renewed Life: Alice Kamaka and Rosalie Blaisdell
  2. pp. 363-372
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  1. Chapter 31. A Blending of Souls: Tandy MacKenzie, Adeline Bolster, and Maria von Trapp
  2. pp. 373-380
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  1. Chapter 32. Every Night We Have Music: John Cambra, Kenso Seki, and the Baldwin Home
  2. pp. 381-392
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  1. Chapter 33. The Suffering Was on Both Sides of the Fence: “Fence-Jumping” at Kalihi Hospital
  2. pp. 393-401
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  1. Part IV. A Time of Evolution (1930–1945)
  2. pp. 403-404
  1. Chapter 34. A Union of Cooperation: Wilhelmina Cooke Carlson and Minerva Ramos
  2. pp. 405-412
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  1. Chapter 35. Another Good Man: The Memoirs of Ambrose Hutchison
  2. pp. 413-424
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  1. Chapter 36. Suddenly the Whole World Changed: Twenty Stories of Separation
  2. pp. 425-436
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  1. Chapter 37. So Friendly: Pearl Harbor and Life at Kalaupapa
  2. pp. 437-451
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  1. Part V. To See This Place Stay Sacred (1946–present)
  2. pp. 453-454
  1. Chapter 38. Always This Line of Separation: A Cure, Barriers, and Lawrence Judd
  2. pp. 455-470
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  1. Chapter 39. Courage and Refusal to Quit: Richard Marks and the End of the Isolation Policy
  2. pp. 471-484
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  1. Chapter 40. A Quest for Dignity: Bernard K. Punikai‘a and Hale Mohalu
  2. pp. 485-494
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  1. Chapter 41. “My Name Is Olivia”: Kalaupapa’s First Author
  2. pp. 495-502
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  1. Chapter 42. To See This Place Stay Sacred: The Education and Inspiration of Present and Future Generations
  2. pp. 503-514
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  1. Chapter 43. Changed in One Day: The Restoration of Family Ties
  2. pp. 515-534
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. 535-539
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 541-558
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 559-563
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  1. Index of Names
  2. pp. 565-572
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  1. Index of Subjects
  2. pp. 573-575
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  1. About the Author, Production Notes, Back Cover
  2. p. 577
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Additional Information

ISBN
9780824865801
Related ISBN
9780824834654
MARC Record
OCLC
830023588
Launched on MUSE
2012-12-20
Language
English
Open Access
No
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