In this Book

summary
Among the most pervasive of stereotypes imposed upon southern highlanders is that they were white, opposed slavery, and supported the Union before and during the Civil War, but the historical record suggests far different realities. John C. Inscoe has spent much of his scholarly career exploring the social, economic and political significance of slavery and slaveholding in the mountain South and the complex nature of the region’s wartime loyalties, and the brutal guerrilla warfare and home front traumas that stemmed from those divisions. The essays here embrace both facts and fictions related to those issues, often conveyed through intimate vignettes that focus on individuals, families, and communities, keeping the human dimension at the forefront of his insights and analysis. Drawing on the memories, memoirs, and other testimony of slaves and free blacks, slaveholders and abolitionists, guerrilla warriors, invading armies, and the highland civilians they encountered, Inscoe considers this multiplicity of perspectives and what is revealed about highlanders’ dual and overlapping identities as both a part of, and distinct from, the South as a whole. He devotes attention to how the truths derived from these contemporary voices were exploited, distorted, reshaped, reinforced, or ignored by later generations of novelists, journalists, filmmakers, dramatists, and even historians with differing agendas over the course of the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. His cast of characters includes John Henry, Frederick Law Olmsted and John Brown, Andrew Johnson and Zebulon Vance, and those who later interpreted their stories—John Fox and John Ehle, Thomas Wolfe and Charles Frazier, Emma Bell Miles and Harry Caudill, Carter Woodson and W. J. Cash, Horace Kephart and John C. Campbell, even William Faulkner and Flannery O’Connor. Their work and that of many others have contributed much to either our understanding—or misunderstanding—of nineteenth century Appalachia and its place in the American imagination.

Table of Contents

  1. Front cover
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  1. Copyright
  2. p. vi
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xi-xv
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-10
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  1. 1. Race and Racism in Nineteenth-Century Appalachia: Myths, Realities, and Ambiguities
  2. pp. 13-45
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  1. 2. Between Bondage and Freedom: Confronting the Variables of Appalachian Slavery and Slaveholding
  2. pp. 46-64
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  1. 3. Olmsted in Appalachia: A Connecticut Yankee Encounters Slavery in the Southern Highlands, 1854
  2. pp. 65-79
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  1. 4. Mountain Masters as Confederate Opportunists:The Slave Trade in Western North Carolina, 1861–1865
  2. pp. 80-100
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  1. 5. The Secession Crisis and Regional Self-Image: The Contrasting Cases of Western North Carolina and East Tennessee
  2. pp. 103-123
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  1. 6. Highland Households Divided:Familial Deceptions, Diversions, and Divisions in Southern Appalachia’s Inner Civil War
  2. pp. 124-143
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  1. 7. Coping in Confederate Appalachia: Portrait of a Mountain Woman and Her Community at War
  2. pp. 144-174
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  1. 8. "Moving through Deserter Country": Fugitive Accounts of Southern Appalachia’s Inner Civil War
  2. pp. 175-203
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  1. 9. "Talking Heroines": Elite Mountain Women as Chroniclers of Stoneman’s Raid, April 1865
  2. pp. 204-224
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  1. 10. The Racial "Innocence" of Appalachia: William Faulkner and the Mountain South
  2. pp. 227-241
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  1. 11. A Fugitive Slave in Frontier Appalachia: The Journey of August King on Film
  2. pp. 242-255
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  1. 12. "A Northern Wedge Thrust into the Heart of the Confederacy": Explaining Civil War Loyalties in the Age of Appalachian Discovery, 1900–1921
  2. pp. 256-281
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  1. 13. Unionists in the Attic: The Shelton Laurel Massacre Dramatized
  2. pp. 282-302
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  1. 14. Appalachian Odysseus: Love, War, and Best-sellerdom in the Blue Ridge
  2. pp. 303-321
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  1. 15. Guerrilla War and Remembrance: Reconstructing a Father’s Murder and a Community’s Civil War
  2. pp. 322-349
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  1. 16. Race and Remembrance in West Virginia: John Henry for a Postmodernist Age
  2. pp. 350-363
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  1. 17. In Defense of Appalachia on Film: Hollywood, History, and the Highland South
  2. pp. 364-381
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  1. Credits
  2. pp. 381-384
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 385-395
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Additional Information

ISBN
9780813129617
Related ISBN
9780813124995
MARC Record
OCLC
609308742
Pages
412
Launched on MUSE
2012-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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