Cover

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Title Page

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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p. vii

This book is a joint project of the Centre for Studies in Religion and Society and the Centre on Aging at the University of Victoria, Canada. Authors were recruited and then met to present first drafts of their chapters at a seminar hosted...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-8

In the 1960s in London, England, Cicely Saunders introduced a new way of treating the terminally ill, which she called “hospice care.” Saunders, a trained nurse, social worker, and medical doctor, held that humans should be able to die with dignity and at peace...

Part I: Religious Understandings of a Good Death

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pp. 9-164

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Chapter 1: Cicely Saunders and the Development of Hospice Palliative Care

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pp. 11-28

Religion has had a profound role in shaping the development of the international hospice movement. It remains a vibrant force in informing the philosophy, organization, and day-to-day delivery of hospice care in many settings. It all goes back to the...

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Chapter 2: “Like a Ripe Fruit Separating Effortlessly from Its Vine”: Religious Understandings of a Good Death: Hinduism

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pp. 29-50

Hinduism is an astonishingly diverse religious tradition, perhaps more so than other major religions. “Hindu” is not a founder’s personal name and does not give any suggestions about beliefs and practices. It is the Iranian version of the name of a river that the...

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Chapter 3: Welcoming an Old Friend: Buddhist Perspectives on Good Death

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pp. 51-75

Christina was an artist, a mother, and a Buddhist who had been living with cancer for most of her adult life. She had been diagnosed with cancer shortly after her daughter, now seventeen, was born, and accepted the inevitability of it one day returning...

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Chapter 4: Muslim Perspectives on a Good Death in Hospice and End‑of‑Life Care

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pp. 77-98

Recent studies have highlighted the importance of spiritual care as a fundamental component in palliative care, advocating extensive training and skill development for health care professionals (Marr et al. 2007). If this conclusion can be drawn for the population...

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Chapter 5: Tradition and Change in Jewish Ideals Regarding a “Good” Death

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pp. 99-122

For much of 2008 the issue of a good death as it related to Jewish religious life made news, first in Canada and then abroad, by way of the media and the Canadian courts. This interest was motivated by the case of an eighty‑four‑year‑old Winnipeg man...

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Chapter 6: Dying Well in Christianity

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pp. 123-143

The Christian movement, from the outset, has been characterized by diversity. Inspired by the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth, it offers a healing and redemptive pattern of living. It has been central in the founding of hospices...

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Chapter 7: Chinese Religions and Hospice Care

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pp. 145-164

Cicely Saunders’s idea of “total pain” and her philosophy of hospice care have played an exceptional role in drawing health care professionals’ attention to the psychospiritual aspect of illness as perceived by terminal patients. Research in medical anthropology...

Part II: Case Studies

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Chapter 8: Buddhist Hospice Care in Thailand

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pp. 167-189

Thailand is a rapidly urbanizing and industrializing country with a population of around 65 million people, of which 94 percent are Buddhist. The health care system is a combination of state‑supported and private institutions that offer a high standard...

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Chapter 9: The Ugandan Way of Living and Dying

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pp. 191-210

Religion permeates the social and cultural fabric of Uganda. Belief systems find expression everywhere in a rich variety of religious practices and liturgies. Christian churches—from Roman Catholic to Pentecostal and other charismatics...

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Chapter 10: Punjabi Extended Family Hospice Care

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pp. 211-230

This chapter concerns a single case study of the “upstream” (earlier in the dying process) palliative care provided to an elderly woman—Durga Devi Marwah (ca. 1911–1999)—at her home when she was experiencing a gradual decline in health...

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Chapter 11: Seeking Physical, Cultural, Ethical, and Spiritual “Safe Space” for a Good Death: The Experience of Indigenous Peoples in Accessing Hospice Care

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pp. 231-255

Access to hospice care and palliative treatment has increased rapidly over the past three decades, but not for everyone. A 2000 Senate subcommittee report on quality end‑of‑life care in Canada, for example, estimated that approximately 15 percent of Canadians who require hospice palliative...

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Chapter 12: Caring for Children in Hospice and Palliative Care: The Spiritual/Religious Dimension

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pp. 257-275

Life‑limiting illness in childhood deeply affects the child, parents, and other family members, and those who care for her or him. Infant mortality rates declined dramatically in the last century in many parts of the world due primarily to successes...

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Chapter 13: Interfaith Chaplaincy in Hospice Palliative Care

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pp. 277-295

After almost twenty years of working as nurses and academics in hospice palliative care, we find ourselves wondering why we have not given much critical consideration to the place of religion within this field. We agree with others that religious and spiritual...

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Conclusion

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pp. 297-315

The authors of this book set out to answer the question, “What are the understandings of a good death in the major religious traditions for use in hospice palliative care?” In our chapters on the specific religious traditions (Part I) and on real‑life...

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Glossary of Terms and Abbreviations

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pp. 317-325

This glossary comprises terms and abbreviations that the authors felt deserved greater clarification, as well as terms that will be commonly found in clinical situations. These definitions are not standardized, but reflect the way that...

Contributors

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pp. 327-332

Index

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pp. 333-340