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The first full-scale history of the creation, growth, and ultimate decline of the dominant twentieth-century model for American Jewish education Samson Benderly inaugurated the first Bureau of Jewish Education in 1910 amid a hodgepodge of congregational schools, khayders, community Talmud Torahs, and private tutors. Drawing on the theories of Johann Pestalozzi, Herbert Spencer, and John Dewey, and deriving inspiration from cultural Zionism, Benderly sought to modernize Jewish education by professionalizing the field, creating an immigrant-based, progressive supplementary school model, and spreading the mantra of community responsibility for Jewish education. With philanthropist Jacob Schiff and influential laymen financing his plans, Benderly realized that his best hope for transforming the educational landscape nationwide was to train a younger generation of teachers, principals, and bureau leaders. These young men became known collectively as the “Benderly Boys,” who, from the 1920s to the 1970s, were the dominant force in Jewish education—both formal and informal—in the United States.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. c-i
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  1. Series Page, Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. ii-vi
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-xii
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-10
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  1. Part I: Making Order out of Chaos, 1900–1939
  2. pp. 11-16
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  1. 1 The Making of the Master
  2. pp. 17-35
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  1. 2 The New York Bureau and Its Critics
  2. pp. 36-54
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  1. 3 A Few Good Men (and Women)
  2. pp. 55-90
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  1. 4 The Struggle for a Modern School System
  2. pp. 91-116
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  1. 5 The Organization of a Jewish Education Profession
  2. pp. 117-158
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  1. 6 Progress under Threat
  2. pp. 159-184
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  1. Part II: Jewish Learning for Jewish Living, 1910–1945
  2. pp. 185-190
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  1. 7 Education as Enculturation
  2. pp. 191-212
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  1. 8 The Jewish School Curriculum and the Limits of Progressive Reform
  2. pp. 213-236
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  1. 9 The Central Jewish Institute
  2. pp. 237-267
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  1. 10 ‘‘An Environment of Our Own Making’’
  2. pp. 268-322
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  1. Part III: Between "K’lal Yisrael" and Denominationalism,1940–1965
  2. pp. 323-327
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  1. 11 Unity in Diversity?
  2. pp. 328-374
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  1. 12 Rebuilding, Renewal, and Reconciliation in the Postwar Era
  2. pp. 375-408
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  1. Conclusion
  2. pp. 409-420
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 421-478
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 479-500
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781611682939
Related ISBN
9781584659662
MARC Record
OCLC
782925938
Pages
512
Launched on MUSE
2013-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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