Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-xi

The seeds of this book have been germinating for close to a decade in my research, writing, and teaching on human rights and postcolonial literature, but Human Rights, Inc. takes the form it has here in the context of the late emergence of a nascent field that is beginning to sketch the parameters of interdisciplinary study of human...

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Preamble: The Legibility of Human Rights

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pp. 1-44

‘‘Everyone knows, or should know, why human rights are important,’’ writes John Humphrey, Canadian legal scholar and first director of the United Nations Human Rights Division, in a commemorative essay on the fortieth anniversary of the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) by the...

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Chapter 1: Novel Subjects and Enabling Fictions: The Formal Articulation of International Human Rights Law

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pp. 45-85

Like mythical twins separated at birth by the geographical accidents of British imperialism, two Watts—Ian and Alan—found themselves grappling with the battered legacy of the Enlightenment’s emancipatory promise in the aftermath of World War II, converging on Robinson Crusoe as a signal literary marker of the historical emergence of rationalized individualism. The apprentice literary...

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Chapter 2: Becoming Plots: Human Rights, the Bildungsroman, and the Novelization of Citizenship

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pp. 86-139

In her first major speech as United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights in 1997, Ireland’s former president Mary Robinson admonished the international body for having abandoned its historical mission of ‘‘realising human rights’’: ‘‘Somewhere along the...

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Chapter 3: Normalizing Narrative Forms of Human Rights: The (Dys)Function of the Public Sphere

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pp. 140-204

‘‘When the police came to mamCatherine’s house in 1976, they said: . . . Let’s search the bedroom.’’1 The scene of this domestic invasion by the state is Catherine Mlangeni’s South African township home, to which apartheid police had come looking for her son...

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Chapter 4: Compulsory Development: Narrative Self-Sponsorship and the Right to Self-Determination

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pp. 205-269

‘‘DEVELOPMENT IS A LIE’’ protests a placard carried by Manu, a recurring character in Epeli Hau’ofa’s satirical short stories, Tales of the Tikongs (1983), about the euphoria of developmentalism that washed over Tonga and other Pacific-island nations in the 1970s, during the heyday of internationally sponsored development projects...

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Chapter 5: Clefs a` Roman: Reading, Writing, and International Humanitarianism

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pp. 270-316

In a racially mixed school in a predominantly African-immigrant neighborhood of Paris, Mamadou Traoré, the young protagonist of Calixthe Beyala’s novel Loukoum: The ‘Little Prince’ of Belleville (1995), gets his first official lesson in international relations and French humanitarianism. ‘‘The world,’’ instructs his teacher with...

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Codicil: Intimations of a Human Rights International: ‘‘The Rights of Man; or, What Are We [Reading] For?’’

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pp. 317-328

Eight days after the world’s most notorious Baathist, ex-Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, was pulled from a spider hole by U.S. forces outside of Tikrit in December 2003, National Public Radio aired a review of a recently translated Saudi Arabian Bildungsroman entitled...

Notes

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pp. 329-388

Bibliography

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pp. 389-418

Index

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pp. 419-436