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Long-term care can be vexing on a personal as well as social level, and it will only grow more so as individuals continue to live longer and the population of aged persons increases in the United States and around the world. This volume explores the ethical issues surrounding elder care from an ecological perspective to propose a new theory of global justice for long-term care. Care work is organized not just nationally, as much current debate suggests, but also transnationally, through economic, labor, immigration, and health policies established by governments, international lending bodies, and for-profit entities, in a manner that raises pressing questions of local as well as global responsibility. Taking an epistemological approach termed “ecological knowing,” Lisa A. Eckenwiler examines this organizational structure to show how it creates and sustains injustice against the dependent elderly and those who care for them, including a growing number of migrant care workers, and weakens the capacities of so-called source countries and their health care systems. She identifies those who are harmed by the existing long-term care system—the elderly, family caregivers, and paid care workers, especially migrants and populations in source countries—and from there offers a corrective philosophical framework. By focusing on the fact that a range of policies, people, and places are interrelated and mutually dependent, Eckenwiler is able not only to provide a holistic understanding of the way long-term care works to generate injustice, but also to find ethical and practicable policy solutions for caring for aging populations in the United States and in less well-off parts of the world. Deeply considered and empirically informed, this examination of the troubles in transnational long-term care is the first to probe the issue from a perspective that reckons with the interdependence of policies, people, and places, and the first to recommend ways policymakers, planners, and families can together develop cohesive, coherent long-term care policies around the ideal of justice.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
  2. pp. i-vi
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-xii
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-12
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  1. 1 The Plight of the Dependent Elderly and Their Families
  2. pp. 13-26
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  1. 2 The Plight of Paid Workers in Long-term Care
  2. pp. 27-48
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  1. 3 Tracing Injustice in Long-term Care
  2. pp. 49-69
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  1. 4 An Ecological Ethic
  2. pp. 70-86
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  1. 5 Realizing Justice Globally in Long-term Care
  2. pp. 87-106
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 107-112
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  1. References
  2. pp. 113-146
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 147-154
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781421405513
Related ISBN
9781421405506
MARC Record
OCLC
799989249
Pages
144
Launched on MUSE
2012-06-08
Language
English
Open Access
No
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