Frontmatter

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Women Witnessing Terror

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Contents

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p. vii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

I am grateful to the numerous colleagues, friends, and family who have provided me with encouragement, advice, criticism, and unending patience and support during the writing of this book. At Georgetown University I found a community of scholars and friends across the disciplines whose generosity in reading...

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Preface

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pp. xi-xvi

My project in this book arises, I have come to discover, from a set of concerns that revolve around silence: the silences of history and within families and the silences that mediate relations between individuals and states that shape and guide many of our cultural configurations. Arrayed against such silences are performative...

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Chapter 1: Witness and Testimony: Ethics, Trauma, Speech, and Paradox

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pp. 1-41

Both critical studies and human rights discourse are grounded in post–World War II reactions to the massive atrocities of the first half of the twentieth century. The project of this chapter is to set up a productive engagement between these two discourses while insisting that both are missing an opportunity actually to engage...

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Chapter 2: ‘‘The Erotics of Violence’’: Performing Violence in The Balcony and The Conduct of Life

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pp. 43-73

This chapter examines the body staged in order to focus specifically on the ways in which identity is formed in violence and the ways such violence can be aestheticized in theatrical representation. While the chapter considers to some extent the role that eroticism, especially in the discourse of perpetrators, plays...

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Chapter 3: Testimonial and Surviving: Gender and the Crisis of Witnessing

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pp. 75-141

Because the Holocaust happened before and was one of the primary motivations behind the adoption of the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, this chapter treats testimony by Holocaust survivors as a first step toward considering the ways in which such concepts as ‘‘the individual,’’ ‘‘the universal,’’ and...

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Chapter 4: State Terror and the Ethical Witness

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pp. 143-187

The term ‘‘testimony,’’ as I am employing it in this book, is a very particular genre of testimonial writing—the writing of atrocity—that sometimes falls within but is not synonymous with the genre of Latin-American testimonio as critics such as George Yúdice, John Beverley, and Doris Sommer have defined it.1 As...

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Chapter 5: Testimonial, Trauma, and the Crises of Discourse in Bosnia

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pp. 189-214

In this chapter I suggest a broadening of the category of testimonial literature to include a much greater range of texts than is generally considered as part of the genre. I have noted that testimonial literature draws attention to the inadequacy of two discourses—the purely literary and the purely legal—to address issues...

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Chapter 6: Grounded Ethics: Testimonial Witnessing from Rural Afghanistan to the United States

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pp. 215-253

I spent the academic year of 2000 to 2001 in Pakistan and Afghanistan doing initial research for a project on Afghan women and the international aid industry, returning to Washington, D.C., two weeks before the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. During that time, I also worked on several projects for the United...

Notes

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pp. 255-268

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 269-282

Index

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pp. 283-286