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  • Fair Trade and Social Justice: Global Ethnographies
  • Book
  • Mark Moberg
  • 2010
  • Published by: NYU Press
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summary

By 2008, total Fair Trade purchases in the developed world reached nearly $3 billion, a five-fold increase in four years. Consumers pay a “fair price” for Fair Trade items, which are meant to generate greater earnings for family farmers, cover the costs of production, and support socially just and environmentally sound practices. Yet constrained by existing markets and the entities that dominate them, Fair Trade often delivers material improvements for producers that are much more modest than the profound social transformations the movement claims to support.
There has been scant real-world assessment of Fair Trade’s effectiveness. Drawing upon fine-grained anthropological studies of a variety of regions and commodity systems including Darjeeling tea, coffee, crafts, and cut flowers, the chapters in Fair Trade and Social Justice represent the first works to use ethnographic case studies to assess whether the Fair Trade Movement is actually achieving its goals.
Contributors: Julia Smith, Mark Moberg, Catherine Ziegler , Sarah Besky, Sarah M. Lyon, Catherine S. Dolan, Patrick C. Wilson, Faidra Papavasiliou, Molly Doane, Kathy M’Closkey, Jane Henrici

Table of Contents

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  1. Cover
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  1. Frontmatter
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. 1. What’s Fair?: The Paradox of Seeking Justice through Markets
  2. pp. 1-23
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  1. PART I: GLOBAL MARKETS AND LOCAL REALITIES: REGULATING AND EXPANDING FAIR TRADE
  2. pp. 25-27
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  1. 2. Fair Trade and the Specialty Coffee Market: Growing Alliances, Shifting Rivalries
  2. pp. 28-46
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  1. 3. A New World?: Neoliberalism and Fair Trade Farming in the Eastern Caribbean
  2. pp. 47-71
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  1. 4. Fair Flowers: Environmental and Social Labeling in the Global Cut Flower Trade
  2. pp. 72-96
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  1. 5. Colonial Pasts and Fair Trade Futures: Changing Modes of Production and Regulation on Darjeeling Tea Plantations
  2. pp. 97-122
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  1. PART II: NEGOTIATING DIFFERENCE AND IDENTITY IN FAIR TRADE MARKETS
  1. 6. A Market of Our Own: Women’s Livelihoods and Fair Trade Markets
  2. pp. 125-146
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  1. 7. Fractured Ties: The Business of Development in Kenyan Fair Trade Tea
  2. pp. 147-175
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  1. 8. Fair Trade Craft Production and Indigenous Economies: Reflections on “Acceptable” Indigeneities
  2. pp. 176-197
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  1. PART III : RELATIONSHIPS AND CONSUMPTION IN FAIR TRADE MARKETS AND ALTERNATIVE ECONOMIES
  2. pp. 199-201
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  1. 9. Fair Money, Fair Trade: Tracing Alternative Consumption in a Local Currency Economy
  2. pp. 202-228
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  1. 10. Relationship Coffees: Structure and Agency in the Fair Trade System
  2. pp. 229-257
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  1. 11. Novica, Navajo Knock-Offs, and the ’Net: A Critique of Fair Trade Marketing Practices
  2. pp. 258-282
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  1. 12. Naming Rights: Ethnographies of Fair Trade
  2. pp. 283-298
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  1. About the Contributors
  2. pp. 299-300
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 301-307
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