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Lincoln of Kentucky

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Preface

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pp. vii-x

Although Abraham Lincoln left his native Kentucky before his eighth birthday and returned for only a few visits during the rest of his life, he had numerous ties with the state. Thousands of Kentuckians other than the Lincolns had crossed the Ohio River by the early nineteenth century, and in...

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1. Lincoln in Kentucky's Memory

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pp. 1-15

President Abraham Lincoln spent part of April 14, 1865, consulting with his cabinet on ways to restore the Southern states to their rightful place in the Union as quickly as possible. Although only Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia had surrendered by then, the long war was practically...

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2. A Kentucky Boyhood

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pp. 16-25

Abraham Lincoln never knew much about the history of his family, and he did not try very hard to learn about it. He was a self-made man in the truest sense of the term; his record could speak for him with little reference to ancestors. Lincoln once dismissed questions about his ancestry by saying. "I don't...

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3. Kentuckians in Indiana

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pp. 26-39

In the fall of 1816, Thomas Lincoln made a trip into Indiana to select a spot for their new home. He decided on a heavily wooded area on Pigeon Creek in Perry County. (It later became Spencer County.) Vines and underbrush were so heavy that a path had to be hacked through them to reach the site...

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4. Kentuckians in Illinois

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pp. 40-58

When Abraham Lincoln moved to New Salem in July 1831 after his second trip to New Orleans, he had no idea what line of work he would undertake, except that if at all possible it would not be farming. Denton Offutt had not yet built the store in which Lincoln was to clerk, so for a time he...

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5. Lincoln and Romance

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pp. 59-77

When Abraham Lincoln moved to New Salem in the summer of 1831, he was twenty-two years old and an eligible bachelor despite his lack of a steady income. He became popular almost immediately with the males in the community, but he was shy and awkward with the females, especially...

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6. Lincoln and Slavery to 1854

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pp. 78-92

After Lincoln completed his term in Congress, he concentrated for several years on building up his law practice. He and Herndon worked well together, with Billy doing much of the general research required to prepare a case and calling Lincoln's attention to significant information. Lincoln was adept...

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7. The Gathering Storm

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pp. 93-110

One of the many portents of change for Lincoln in the 1850s was his reluctant decision to become a Republican. Whigism was in his political bones, but that party was crumbling fast, and with its disappearance went one of the bonds of national union. In sharp contrast, the Republican party would...

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8. An Election, a War, and Kentucky's Neutrality

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pp. 111-138

During most of the nineteenth century, presidential candidates did not campaign openly; the post was supposed to seek the man. Lincoln remained true to that tradition, but a number of managers pushed his campaign. Some dealt with particular constituencies; Gustave Koerner, for example, was...

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9. The War Enters Kentucky

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pp. 139-154

The Border State Convention that Kentucky had called met in Frankfort on May 27,1861. Only Kentucky and Missouri were represented, plus one person from Tennessee, who was not officially admitted. The convention called for constitutional amendments to protect states' rights, continued...

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10. Lincoln and Military Operations in Kentucky

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pp. 155-175

President Lincoln paid considerable attention to the course of the Civil War in Kentucky, although it was only briefly, upon occasion, one of the major theaters in the conflict. He did so in part because of his acute and continuing interest in the state during its period of neutrality, but he continued his...

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11. Wartime Politics in Kentucky

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pp. 176-193

Though lessened, Lincoln's concern with Kentucky affairs did not end when the state ceased to be a theater of major military operations. Much that happened in the state continued to be influenced by the war, and the president was frequently involved with issues that were referred to him. Given...

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12. Lincoln and Wartime Issues in Kentucky

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pp. 194-220

The military governors were the focal point for much of the unrest in Kentucky and for the many disputes with the national government. They were in an almost impossible position. As army officers they had a duty to execute the orders that they were given, and most of them had a genuine interest in doing...

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13. Lincoln, Slavery, and Kentucky

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pp. 221-246

Although Lincoln hoped for the ultimate end of slavery, his primary object in 1861 was the preservation of the Union. Four slave states had remained in the Union, and they seemed to the president to offer a way to move toward voluntary emancipation within the framework of states' rights but with...

Notes

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pp. 247-275

Bibliographical Essay

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pp. 277-286

Index

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pp. 287-305

Image Plates

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