In this Book

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This book firmly positions lived experience-led expertise as a unique and compelling form of knowledge in decolonising and disrupting research, teaching and advocacy. Based on the insights of people with first-hand experiences, each chapter presents unique accounts and reflections on a diverse range of social justice issues. Together, the authors’ perspectives centre lived experiences in the production of knowledge, challenge outsider-imposed views, and create new research and writing norms. They demonstrate that, when lived experience experts lead the way, their knowledge of how to address social injustices can enrich, transform and decolonise research, teaching and advocacy. This collection is an invaluable resource for academic and community-based researchers, practitioners, advocates, educators, policy makers, students and people whose lived experiences and views continue to be marginalised across diverse settings.This book firmly positions lived experience-led expertise as a unique and compelling form of knowledge in decolonising and disrupting research, teaching and advocacy. Based on the insights of people with first-hand experiences, each chapter presents unique accounts and reflections on a diverse range of social justice issues. Together, the authors’ perspectives centre lived experiences in the production of knowledge, challenge outsider-imposed views, and create new research and writing norms. They demonstrate that, when lived experience experts lead the way, their knowledge of how to address social injustices can enrich, transform and decolonise research, teaching and advocacy. This collection is an invaluable resource for academic and community-based researchers, practitioners, advocates, educators, policy makers, students and people whose lived experiences and views continue to be marginalised across diverse settings.

Table of Contents

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  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication, Epigraph
  2. pp. i-viii
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  1. Table of Contents
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Series editor's preface
  2. Kalwant Bhopal
  3. pp. xi-xii
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  1. List of figures
  2. p. xiii
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  1. Notes on contributors
  2. pp. xiv-xx
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  1. Acknowledgements
  2. p. xxi
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. 23-25
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  1. 1 Unpacking disruptive methodologies: what do we know about lived experience-led knowledge and scholarship?
  2. Maree Higgins and Caroline Lenette
  3. pp. 26-43
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  1. PART I Theoretical grounding and underpinning values
  1. 2 Examining for the purpose of knowing: Ngaabigi Winhangagigu
  2. Uncle Stan Grant (Senior), Sue Green, Deb Evans, Donna Murray, Letitia Harris and Harry Lambshead
  3. pp. 46-60
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  1. 3 Towards a scholarship of Critical Lived Experience Engagement: big feelings, big stories, big learning
  2. Rebecca J. Moran
  3. pp. 61-75
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  1. PART II Scrutinising lived experience research processes through leadership and collaboration
  1. 4 Lived experience perspectives on a co-design process: the ‘Under the Radar' men's suicide prevention project
  2. Stephen Lake, Anonymous Lived Experience Advisors, Campbell Clerke, William Crompton, Norman Stevens, Ivan Ma, John O’Loughlin, Peter Sutton and Matt Whitten
  3. pp. 78-104
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  1. 5 Co-researching with persons with disabilities: reflections and lessons learned
  2. Chrysant Lily Kusumowardoyo, Husna Yuni Wulansari, Irmansyah Songgoua, Elias Katapi, Zainab and Yassin Ali Hadu
  3. pp. 105-125
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  1. PART III Decolonising lived experience research
  1. 6 Ethical and decolonial considerations of co-research in refugee studies: what are we missing?
  2. Atem Dau Atem and Maree Higgins
  3. pp. 128-143
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  1. 7 Combating colonially pathologised universalisation: a transwoman's Indo-Australian lived experience
  2. Estelle Keerthana Ramaswamy
  3. pp. 144-158
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  1. 8 Responding collaboratively to COVID-19 and our health needs across Pacific communities: CORE Pacific Collective
  2. Jioji Ravulo, Seini Afeaki, Malaemie Fruean, Donina Va’a and Maherau Arona
  3. pp. 159-176
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  1. 9 The potential of lived experience-led knowledge to dismantle the academy
  2. Caroline Lenette and Maree Higgins
  3. pp. 177-187
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 188-195
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