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A cutting-edge view of the digital humanities at a time of global pandemic, catastrophe, and uncertainty

Where do the digital humanities stand in 2023? Debates in the Digital Humanities 2023 presents a state-of-the-field vision of digital humanities amid rising social, political, economic, and environmental crises; a global pandemic; and the deepening of austerity regimes in U.S. higher education. Providing a look not just at where DH stands but also where it is going, this fourth volume in the Debates in the Digital Humanities series features both established scholars and emerging voices pushing the field’s boundaries, asking thorny questions, and providing space for practitioners to bring to the fore their research and their hopes for future directions in the field. Carrying forward the themes of political and social engagement present in the series throughout, it includes crucial contributions to the field—from a vital forum centered on the voices of Black women scholars, manifestos from feminist and Latinx perspectives on data and DH, and a consideration of Indigenous data and artificial intelligence, to essays that range across topics such as the relation of DH to critical race theory, capital, and accessibility.

Contributors: Harmony Bench, Ohio State U; Christina Boyles, Michigan State U; Megan R. Brett, George Mason U; Michelle Lee Brown, Washington State U; Patrick J. Burns, New York U; Kent K. Chang, U of California, Berkeley; Rico Devara Chapman, Clark Atlanta U; Marika Cifor, U of Washington; María Eugenia Cotera, U of Texas; T. L. Cowan, U of Toronto; Marlene L. Daut, U of Virginia; Quinn Dombrowski, Stanford U; Kate Elswit, U of London; Nishani Frazier, U of Kansas; Kim Gallon, Brown U; Patricia Garcia, U of Michigan; Lorena Gauthereau, U of Houston; Masoud Ghorbaninejad, University of Victoria; Abraham Gibson, U of Texas at San Antonio; Nathan P. Gibson, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich; Kaiama L. Glover, Barnard College; Hilary N. Green, Davidson College; Jo Guldi, Southern Methodist U; Matthew N. Hannah, Purdue U Libraries; Jeanelle Horcasitas, DigitalOcean; Christy Hyman, Mississippi State U; Arun Jacob, U of Toronto; Jessica Marie Johnson, Johns Hopkins U and Harvard U; Martha S. Jones, Johns Hopkins U; Annette K. Joseph-Gabriel, Duke U; Mills Kelly, George Mason U; Spencer D. C. Keralis, Digital Frontiers; Zoe LeBlanc, U of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Jason Edward Lewis, Concordia U; James Malazita, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Alison Martin, Dartmouth College; Linda García Merchant, U of Houston Libraries; Rafia Mirza, Southern Methodist U; Mame-Fatou Niang, Carnegie Mellon U; Jessica Marie Otis, George Mason U; Marisa Parham, U of Maryland; Andrew Boyles Petersen, Michigan State U Libraries; Emily Pugh, Getty Research Institute; Olivia Quintanilla, UC Santa Barbara; Jasmine Rault, U of Toronto Scarborough; Anastasia Salter, U of Central Florida; Maura Seale, U of Michigan; Celeste Tường Vy Sharpe, Normandale Community College; Astrid J. Smith, Stanford U Libraries; Maboula Soumahoro, U of Tours; Mel Stanfill, U of Central Florida; Tonia Sutherland, U of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Gabriela Baeza Ventura, U of Houston; Carolina Villarroel, U of Houston; Melanie Walsh, U of Washington; Hēmi Whaanga, U of Waikato; Bridget Whearty, Binghamton U; Jeri Wieringa, U of Alabama; David Joseph Wrisley, NYU Abu Dhabi.



Cover alt text: A text-based cover with the main title repeating right-side up and upside down. The leftmost iteration appears in black ink; all others are white.

Table of Contents

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  1. Cover Page
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  1. Title Page
  2. pp. i-iv
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-viii
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  1. Introduction: The Digital Humanities, Moment to Moment
  2. Matthew K. Gold and Lauren F. Klein
  3. pp. ix-xvi
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  1. Part I: Openings and Interventions
  2. pp. 1-2
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  1. Chapter 1: Toward a Political Economy of Digital Humanities
  2. Matthew N. Hannah
  3. pp. 3-26
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  1. Chapter 2: All the Work You Do Not See: Labor, Digitizers, and the Foundations of Digital Humanities
  2. Astrid J. Smith and Bridget Whearty
  3. pp. 27-46
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  1. Chapter 3: Right-to-Left (RTL) Text: Digital Humanists Plus Half a Billion Users
  2. Masoud Ghorbaninejad, Nathan P. Gibson, and David Joseph Wrisley
  3. pp. 47-73
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  1. Chapter 4: Relation-Oriented AI: Why Indigenous Protocols Matter for the Digital Humanities
  2. Michelle Lee Brown, Hēmi Whaanga, and Jason Edward Lewis
  3. pp. 74-83
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  1. Chapter 5: A U.S. Latinx Digital Humanities Manifesto
  2. Gabriela Baeza Ventura, María Eugenia Cotera, Linda García Merchant, Lorena Gauthereau, and Carolina Villarroel
  3. pp. 84-90
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  1. Part II: Theories and Approaches
  2. pp. 91-92
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  1. Chapter 6: The Body Is Not (Only) a Metaphor: Rethinking Embodiment in DH
  2. Harmony Bench and Kate Elswit
  3. pp. 93-104
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  1. Chapter 7: The Queer Gap in Cultural Analytics
  2. Kent K. Chang
  3. pp. 105-119
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  1. Chapter 8: The Feminist Data Manifest-NO: An Introduction and Four Reflections
  2. Tonia Sutherland, Marik a Cifor, T. L. Cowan, Jas Rault, and Patricia Garcia
  3. pp. 120-139
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  1. Chapter 9: Black Is Not the Absence of Light: Restoring Black Visibility and Liberation to Digital Humanities
  2. Nishani Frazier, Christy Hyman, and Hilary N. Green
  3. pp. 140-165
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  1. Chapter 10: Digital Humanities in the Deepfake Era
  2. Abraham Gibson
  3. pp. 166-175
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  1. Chapter 11: Operationalizing Surveillance Studies in the Digital Humanities
  2. Christina Boyles, Andrew Boyles Petersen, and Arun Jacob
  3. pp. 176-190
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  1. Part III: Disciplines and Institutions
  2. pp. 191-192
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  1. Chapter 12: A Voice Interrupts: Digital Humanities as a Tool to Hear Black Life
  2. Alison Martin
  3. pp. 193-201
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  1. Chapter 13: Addressing an Emergency: The "Pragmatic Tilt" Required of Scholarship, Data, and Design by the Climate Crisis
  2. Jo Guldi
  3. pp. 202-216
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  1. Chapter 14: Digital Art History as Disciplinary Practice
  2. Emily Pugh
  3. pp. 217-237
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  1. Chapter 15: Building and Sustaining Africana Digital Humanities at HBCUs
  2. Rico Devara Chapman
  3. pp. 238-246
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  1. Chapter 16: A Call to Research Action: Transnational Solidarity for Digital Humanists
  2. Olivia Quintanilla and Jeanelle Horcasitas
  3. pp. 247-260
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  1. Chapter 17: Game Studies, Endgame?
  2. Anastasia Salter and Mel Stanfill
  3. pp. 261-272
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  1. Part IV: Pedagogies and Practices
  2. pp. 273-274
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  1. Chapter 18: The Challenges and Possibilities of Social Media Data: New Directions in Literary Studies and the Digital Humanities
  2. Melanie Walsh
  3. pp. 275-294
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  1. Chapter 19: Language Is Not a Default Setting: Countering DH's English Problem
  2. Quinn Dombrowski and Patrick J. Burns
  3. pp. 295-304
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  1. Chapter 20: Librarians' Illegible Labor: Toward a Documentary Practice of Digital Humanities
  2. Spencer D. C. Keralis, Rafia Mirza, and Maura Seale
  3. pp. 305-323
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  1. Chapter 21: Reframing the Conversation: Digital Humanists, Disabilities, and Accessibility
  2. Megan R. Brett, Jessica Marie Otis, and Mills Kelly
  3. pp. 324-343
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  1. Chapter 22: From Precedents to Collective Action: Realities and Recommendations for Digital Dissertations in History
  2. pp. 344-366
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  1. Chapter 23: Critique Is the Steam: Reorienting Critical Digital Humanities across Disciplines
  2. James Malazita
  3. pp. 367-382
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  1. Part V: Forum: #UnsilencedPast
  2. pp. 383-384
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  1. Chapter 24: Being Undisciplined: Black Womanhood in Digital Spaces
  2. pp. 387-399
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  1. Chapter 25: How This Helps Us Get Free: Telling Black Stories through Technology
  2. A Conversation with Kim Gallon and Marisa Parham
  3. pp. 400-411
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  1. Chapter 26: "Blackness" in France: Taking Up Mediatized Space
  2. A Conversation with Maboula Soumahoro and Mame-Fatou Niang
  3. pp. 412-422
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  1. Chapter 27: The Power to Create: Building Alternative (Digital) Worlds
  2. A Conversation with Martha S. Jones and Jessica Marie Johnson
  3. pp. 423-436
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. 437-438
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 439-444
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