Abstract

abstract:

Arnauld follows Descartes in denying that sensible qualities like color are modes of external objects. Yet, unlike Malebranche, he resists the apparent implication that ordinary statements like 'this marble is white' are false. Arnauld also follows Descartes in saying that we perceive things by having ideas of them. Yet, unlike Malebranche, he denies that this sort of talk implies the existence of intermediaries standing between the mind and its external objects. How can Arnauld avoid these implications? I argue that the answer lies in Arnauld's sophisticated theory of mental and linguistic representation and, in particular, his account of extrinsic denomination.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1538-4586
Print ISSN
0022-5053
Pages
pp. 227-252
Launched on MUSE
2022-04-29
Open Access
No
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