Abstract

ABSTRACT:

Although Gaius Julius Victor has attracted scholarly attention due to his inclusion of letter-writing in his fourth-century rhetorical manual, his peculiar notion of sermocinatio or “impersonation” has gone largely unnoticed. Set against the backdrop of earlier accounts of sermocinatio as a technique of the grand style—including accounts in Quintilian and Cicero—Julius Victor presents impersonation as a method of subtle eloquence most germane to plain-style rubrics. Given Julius Victor’s coupling of sermocinatio and letter-writing, too, his manual suggests that the ascending importance of writing tracks this stylistic reorientation, anticipating our own era’s evolving media and techniques for impersonating others.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1558-9234
Print ISSN
0009-8418
Pages
pp. 179-204
Launched on MUSE
2022-02-16
Open Access
No
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