Abstract

Abstract:

Wars frequently instigate the expansion of health services, a key component of state building. China first witnessed rapid growth in military and civilian health services during the War of Resistance against Japan (1937–1945). This essay explores two factors that enabled this development: low-paid medical work of women and an influx of charitable donations from overseas. It centers gender and women's care work in its analysis and argues that attention to the interpersonal and affective facets of state making shows that atypical state agents can emerge as formidable state-builders in an extraordinary time. As with other facets of the Communist state, health administration owed much to Nationalist-era growth and innovation.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1940-5065
Print ISSN
1521-5385
Pages
pp. 60-70
Launched on MUSE
2022-01-06
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.