Abstract

ABSTRACT:

This paper considers Ovid's allusion to his models including Homer, Vergil and Catullus, particularly within the context of Ovid's description of landscape in the Salmacis/Hermaphroditus episode. Ovid alludes to Vergil in such a way as to suggest comparison of Aeneas and Hermaphroditus, both sons of Venus, for each of whom landscape symbolizes sexual desire for and submission to a dominant female within that landscape. Ovid's allusive technique connects the poems through topographical allusion in such a way as to show similarities and contrast between both the epic characters and Augustan poets.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1558-9234
Print ISSN
0009-8418
Pages
pp. 65-80
Launched on MUSE
2021-11-24
Open Access
No
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