Abstract

Abstract:

Commissioned by the Parisian guild of carpenters and masons, Pierre Gringore’s 6,572-line hagiographical mystery play, La Vie Monseigneur sainct Loÿs par personnaiges (Paris, BnF Fr. 17511), celebrates the life and miracles of Saint Louis IX, king of France, as a community-building endeavor. Basing the work on the medieval genre known as the mirror of princes and the classical tradition of parallel lives, Gringore infused the play with historical allusions as a way to promote a glorious image of the current king, Louis XII, as a new Saint Louis. Yet instead of describing Louis XII as a heroic warrior, according to the paradigms of laudatory rhetoric, he fashioned a portrait of a wise, charitable, and pacifist prince, more inclined to use words than force when confronting his enemies. Rather than being a sign of weakness, pacifism here represents the highest moral value, a reflection of the king’s self-control and his steady reliance on the advice of his council, in contrast to his adversaries, whose actions were guided exclusively by unbridled emotional impulses. This essay uses a variety of political, moral, affective, and drama theories to examine Gringore’s adaptation of allegory as a performative strategy, offering new insight into the author’s choice to reshape the medieval mystery play into a historical and political drama while also seeking the charitable king’s financial support.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2162-9552
Print ISSN
2162-9544
Pages
pp. 265-289
Launched on MUSE
2021-11-01
Open Access
No
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