Abstract

Abstract:

One of the main ways in which populism damages democracy is through the corrosion of political-party systems, a phenomenon that has been especially pronounced in contemporary Latin America. Populism’s core, namely charismatic leadership, is to blame: Overbearing personalistic leaders avoid hemming in their own autonomy and predominance by keeping their electoral movements organizationally fluid and weak. And because opposing populism entails confronting a charismatic leader rather than a clear programmatic project, the opposition itself remains diverse and heterogeneous and thus fails to unify and form a political party. Latin America’s fragmented social structure, high economic volatility, and frequent corruption scandals exacerbate these corrosive tendencies.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-3214
Print ISSN
1045-5736
Pages
pp. 42-55
Launched on MUSE
2021-10-19
Open Access
No
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