Abstract

presis:

Recent debates in Israel highlight a resurfacing of the tensions between secular education and religion by assuming a clear separation between a critical attitude toward religion and the preparing of students for a life of religious obedience. Drawing on Theodor Adorno's discussion of education from the 1960's I wish to challenge this taken-for-granted assumption. I show how Adorno's famous educational appeal for "critical selfreflection" can be traced back to its theological sources. Specifically, I argue that, in Kierkegaard's theology of love, Adorno found a particular case for bringing together critique and theology that he then brought to bear on his educational position in which secular education and religion do not represent contradictory elements.

Abstract:

Recent debates in Israel highlight a resurfacing of the tensions between secular education and religion by assuming a clear separation between a critical attitude towards religion, and the preparing of students for a life of religious obedience. Drawing on Theodor Adorno's discussion of education from the 1960's, I wish to challenge this taken-for-granted assumption. I show how Adorno's famous educational appeal for "critical self-reflection" can be traced back to its theological sources. Specifically, I argue that in Kierkegaard's theology of love, Adorno found a particular case for bringing together critique and theology that he then brought to bear on his educational position in which secular education and religion do not represent contradictory elements.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2162-3937
Print ISSN
0022-0558
Pages
pp. 470-486
Launched on MUSE
2021-08-18
Open Access
No
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