Abstract

Abstract:

In Gill Lewis’s debut novel, Sky Hawk (2011) two children befriend a wounded osprey, starting a chain reaction that ultimately saves a Ghambian girl. However, the animal itself becomes increasingly decorporalized in the process. As this article argues, the human-animal bond in Sky Hawk becomes stronger the more indirect the children’s means of relating to the animal become. Lewis’s human characters can only relate to the symbolic animal, not the real one. While Sky Hawk, on the one hand, is unsettingly anthropocentric and negates direct access to the animal, the story also encourages to dare a metaphoric approach to animals.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1553-1201
Print ISSN
0885-0429
Pages
pp. 125-139
Launched on MUSE
2021-07-23
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.